Bullet-Proof Software

Archon

Archon

Nintendo Entertainment System - December 1, 1989

A chess board is lined with trolls, wizards, knights and other magical beings. Just another strategy game? Don't count on it. When you challenge a square held by the enemy, the board explodes into a battlefield. Your strategic skills on the game board will determine your fate in battle as you take on your opponent in a heartpounding duel to the death. With sixteen different characters and an ever-changing board, you'll never play the same game twice. If the Goblin catches air with his club, the swift sword of the Knight may steal a leg or two. The Sorceress has no fear of the massive,...

Battle Storm

Battle Storm

Nintendo Entertainment System - December 21, 1991

The game allows players to do combat strategies with tanks, airplanes, military bases, and non-nuclear missiles. These advanced weapons allow players to stage a fictional World War III and to simulate modern warfare. Players can assume the persona of various clichéd Hollywood action film stars like Rambo (ジョンランボー), Chuck Norris (チャックノリス), Eddie Murphy (エディマーフィー), Bruce Lee (ブルースリー), and Arnold Schwarzenegger (アーノルドシュワルツェネッガー). Stages include a jungle, forest, the swamp, and urban terrain. The player must choose a tank with his or her directional pad. Once there, the player must decide...

The Black Onyx II: Search for the Fire Crystal

The Black Onyx II: Search for the Fire Crystal

Microsoft MSX - January 1, 1986

After having recovered the legendary Black Onyx in your previous adventure, your party of heroes took the portal in Utsuro town to a new world, where they begin the search for the powerful Fire Crystal. In order to find this mysterious artifact, they have to venture into a system of dungeons and to defeat the monsters that live in them. The sequel to Black Onyx is very similar to its predecessor, graphically as well as gameplay-wise. You build a party of up to five adventurers and take them to fight in first-person 3D dungeons. You encounter random enemies as well as fellow adventurers,...

Faceball

Faceball

Nintendo Virtual Boy - Unreleased

Faceball was going to be one of the games to support the unreleased Virtual Boy GameLink cable. Like the Faceball games on other consoles (like Faceball 2000 on Game Boy and SNES), the Virtual Boy version could be described as an ego shooter with smiley balls. The game offers 2 modes of play, "Normal", which is the main, 1-player game, and "Arena", which most likely is the 2-player mode that uses the link cable. The "Normal" mode consists of 4 stages with 14 mazes each, which makes a total number of 56 levels. Never officially released.

Hatris

Hatris

NEC TurboGrafx-16 - May 24, 1991

Follow-up to Tetris that involves dropping a variety of different hats onto people's heads.

Hatris

Hatris

Nintendo Entertainment System - April 1, 1992

Remember Tetris? The way those cubes kept coming at you? That was tricky enough, but what if they were half a dozen different hats instead? Derbies, baseball caps, cowboy hats, wizard hats, top hats and crowns? Well, that's the whole idea behind Hatris. The hats keep coming at you two at a time. All you have to do is stack them up five at a time and - poof - they're history. It sounds perfectly simple. Until you get into it. Then you'll wish you had six heads instead of one. Because this is the latest game from Alexey Pajitnov, the designer of Tetris, and his partner Vladimir Pokhilko. And...

Hatris

Hatris

Nintendo Game Boy - May 1, 1991

Remember Tetris? The way those cubes kept coming at you? That was tricky enough, but what if they were half a dozen different hats instead? Derbies, baseball caps, cowboy hats, wizard hats, top hats and crowns? Well, that's the whole idea behind Hatris. The hats keep coming at you two at a time. All you have to do is stack them up five at a time and - poof - they're history. It sounds perfectly simple. Until you get into it. Then you'll wish you had six heads instead of one. Because this is the latest game from Alexey Pajitnov, the designer of Tetris, and his partner Vladimir Pokhilko. And...

Igo: Kyuu Roban Taikyoku

Igo: Kyuu Roban Taikyoku

Nintendo Famicom Disk System - Released - April 14, 1987

Igo: Kyuu Roban Taikyoku is the first real attempt to bring the Japanese board game Go to a home console, namely the Famicom. The game was designed by Henk Rogers, a Dutch programmer who would play games of Go against the CEO (at the time) of Nintendo, Hiroshi Yamauchi. It was during one such game that the prospect of developing such a title for the Famicom was discussed. It was later converted from disk format to cartridge and release in August 1987. Prior to the release of this game, Nintendo had released a game which was played on the Go board in 1983, known as Gomoku Narabe Renju, but...

Igo: Kyuu Roban Taikyoku

Igo: Kyuu Roban Taikyoku

Nintendo Entertainment System - August 11, 1987

Pipe Dream

Pipe Dream

Nintendo Game Boy - 1990

Pit your pipe-fitting prowess against a surging stream of soggy sewage. But slow down for a second and it's sludge city! You'll play instinctively, while you think strategically. You'll get good quickly, but you'll always have room to get better. Pipe Dream is a perfect desktop stress-buster and a terrific tournament game and a seriously special strategy puzzle!

Super Black Onyx

Super Black Onyx

Nintendo Entertainment System - Released - April 14, 1988

Super Black Onyx (スーパーブラックオニキス?) is an RPG developed by Bullet Proof Software for the Famicom and published in Japan in 1988. It is an expanded version of the game The Black Onyx, which includes the ability to cast spells, more monsters, and a larger dungeon to explore. It also enhances the presentation of the graphics beyond what was standard for the computer versions at the time, and simplified the controls to be played with a control pad.

Taikyoku Igo: Goliath

Taikyoku Igo: Goliath

Super Nintendo Entertainment System - Released - May 14, 1993

Taikyoku Igo: Goliath is a Go game from Bullet-Proof Software, developed and released exclusively for a Japanese audience. The Goliath in the title refers to Go playing software created by Dutch programmer Mark Boon, which was one of the earliest Go AIs that was able to defeat human professionals. He later adapted Goliath's code for NES hardware, and this is the version that was licensed by Bullet-Proof Software and integrated into this game. The game has various customization options for board size and AI strength, among other features.

Taikyoku Igo: Idaten

Taikyoku Igo: Idaten

Super Nintendo Entertainment System - Released - December 29, 1995

Taikyoku Igo: Idaten ("Playing Go: Idaten") is a Go game for the Super Famicom and the follow up to Bullet-Proof Software's Taikyoku Igo: Goliath from 1993. The game has numerous customization options for the size of the board and the difficulty of the opponent. As well as standard Go games, the player can also attempt instance puzzles where they have a limited amount of time and moves to beat the opponent with a pre-determined board layout.

Tetris

Tetris

Nintendo Entertainment System - Released - December 22, 1988

The version of Tetris that was released in Japan for the Famicom is considerably different from the version of Tetris that was released for the NES around the rest of the world. Developed by Henk Roger's company Bullet Proof Software, it retains the unusual control scheme which makes it one of the least enjoyed conversions of Tetris for the hardware (including the unlicensed Tengen version). In addition to the controls, this version of Tetris is also unique for having "lives" that the player must run out of before the game comes to an end. The player is required to complete 25 lines before...

Tetris

Tetris

Microsoft MSX2 - Released - 1988

This version of Tetris is one of many conversions of the famous block-stacking game. The goal is to place pieces made up of four tiles in a ten-by-twenty well, organizing them into complete rows, which then disappear. The goal of each round is to clear 25 lines, after which the player moves on to the next round. If the stack reaches the top of the field, the player loses a life, and if all three lives are lost, the game is over. The game lets the player choose the starting stage and round, as well as one of three background tunes. Difficulty is increased throughout the stages by an increase...

Tetris

Tetris

Nintendo Game Boy - Released - June 14, 1989

Tetris is a puzzle video game which was released in 1989 by Nintendo for the Game Boy. Geometric shapes fall from the top of a playfield to rest on the bottom; fit the pieces together and the formed line will disappear. If the pieces are not lined up correctly they eventually stack up to the top of the playfield and the game is over. Difficulty increases by dropping the pieces faster and faster over time. Tetris is a verifiable classic game, translated to well over 200 electronic and computer platforms. It takes 2 minutes to learn, but a lifetime to master!

Tetris

Tetris

Sega System 16 - June 6, 1984

Tetris (Russian: Тетрис [ˈtɛtrʲɪs]) is a tile-matching puzzle video game, originally designed and programmed by Russian game designer Alexey Pajitnov. It was released on June 6, 1984, while he was working for the Dorodnitsyn Computing Centre of the Academy of Science of the Soviet Union in Moscow. He derived its name from the Greek numerical prefix tetra- (all of the game's pieces contain four segments) and tennis, Pajitnov's favorite sport.

Tetris

Tetris

Apple II - June 6, 1984

Tetris (Russian: Тетрис [ˈtɛtrʲɪs]) is a tile-matching puzzle video game, originally designed and programmed by Russian game designer Alexey Pajitnov. It was released on June 6, 1984, while he was working for the Dorodnitsyn Computing Centre of the Academy of Science of the Soviet Union in Moscow. He derived its name from the Greek numerical prefix tetra- (all of the game's pieces contain four segments) and tennis, Pajitnov's favorite sport.

Tetris 4D

Tetris 4D

Sega Dreamcast - Released - December 23, 1998

Tetris 4D (テトリス フォーディー) is a Sega Dreamcast game developed and published by Bullet Proof Software. It is an entry in the Tetris series, and was released only in Japan. Being an early Dreamcast game, Tetris 4D does not deviate much from its predecessors. There is a classic mode (which acts as a normal game of Tetris) and a "battle" mode (which allows up to four players to compete against each other). The game has an industrial/urban theme, unlike most other entries in the series which usually have a classical architecture or Russian theme. There are no AI players in the game and no VMU...

Tetris Battle Gaiden

Tetris Battle Gaiden

Super Nintendo Entertainment System - December 24, 1993

Tetris Battle Gaiden is a competitive puzzle-battle game, similar to games such as Puzzle Fighter or Puyo Puyo. One can play against a friend or the Computer in a story mode. There is also an included Rensa mode, which ensures a more hyperactive game due to increased gravity. The player can choose from a list of characters in the story mode, including a Dragon or a pumpkin named Halloween.

Tetris Blast

Tetris Blast

Nintendo Game Boy - January 1, 1996

Have a BLAST! The favorite puzzle sensation EXPLODES back on the Game Boy scene! Test your dexterity at the highest level yet! With rapid moves align blocks containing explosive bombs and clear away the screen. KA-BLAAM!! In FIGHT MODE build a mega bomb and take out menacing enemies that threaten your progress, BOOM! You've never experienced Tetris like this before! It's DYNAM

Tetris S

Tetris S

Sega Saturn - December 27, 1996

Tetris S is a puzzle game developed by Bullet-Proof Software for the Sega Saturn. It is a variation of Tetris made specifically for the Sega Saturn system, compared to Tetris Plus which was an arcade port. During development it was known as BPS Puzzle, possibly until the Tetris license could be secured. Compared to other versions of the game within and before this timeframe, Tetris S is a fairly bare-bones Tetris package, as there's only a one-player mode and a two-player mode (against either a human or a computer opponent). Unlike BPS's normal Tetris works, this game is aesthetically...

Tokyo Highway Battle

Tokyo Highway Battle

Sony Playstation - Released - September 30, 1996

Players navigate through three Tokyo highway circuits driving one of 72 high-performance sports cars. While driving, players earn valuable points which are used to purchase upgrade parts for their vehicle. To ensure the most realistic gameplay, developers Bullet-Proof Software, enlisted the guidance of racing champion, Keiichi Tsuchiya and automotive specialist, Masaaki Bando Under their supervision, Bullet-Proof painstakingly recreated the physics and handling of each race car.

V-Tetris

V-Tetris

Nintendo Virtual Boy - Released - August 25, 1995

V-Tetris (V-???? V-Tetorisu?) is Japanese-exclusive. It is not to be confused with the similar Virtual Boy title 3D Tetris, as the two games are entirely different. V-Tetris is mostly the same as the original Tetris games, the only difference being the cylindrical puzzle mode in which blocks could be placed in a 3-D spiral. By using the L and R buttons, or the right D-pad, the screen shifts a block left or right respectively.

Wild Snake

Sega Game Gear - Unreleased

WildSnake was an interesting take on the Tetris concept whereby players had to guide downwards different sized snakes to make lines. These incoming snakes could be twisted into any shape you desired, therefore eliminating those tricky gaps you always ended up with in Tetris - as long as you could control the slippery slithering blocks.

Wild Snake

Wild Snake

Nintendo Game Boy - Released - September 1, 1994

A deadly nest of snakes. And only you can keep them from getting out! Maneuver each new snake so it touches another of the same kind, making the venomous viper disappear. Sound easy? As long as you con keep matching up snakes, you're in control. But when those poisonous reptiles pile close to the top, you better run for your life!

Yoshi's Cookie

Yoshi's Cookie

Nintendo Entertainment System - Released - April 12, 1993

Cookie chaos for Mario and Yoshi! Mario and Yoshi are filling in at the Cookie Factory and they need your help! Fresh baked cookies roll out of the ovens. It's up to Mario to sort and stack 'em before they pile too high! Line up a row of the same kind of cookies either vertically or horizontally, and they vanish! Clear the screens to move on to a new level of cookie chaos. Yoshi appears from time to time to stir things up. Play for a high score or head-to-head against a friend. The mouth-watering madness doesn't let up! And be sure to keep some cookies close by, 'cause you'll get the munchies...

Yoshi's Cookie

Yoshi's Cookie

Nintendo Game Boy - 1993

Yoshi's Cookie is a fast-paced puzzle game. The player moves randomly placed cookies into rows and columns of cookies with similar patterns. When a row or column of the same cookies is successfully assembled, the line will disappear, and the player can begin to work on a new row or column. The "Yoshi" cookie is very special in both the 1-player and the 2-player game. Since this cookie is the key to both games, it should be used wisely.

Yoshi's Cookie

Yoshi's Cookie

Super Nintendo Entertainment System - Released - July 9, 1993

Mario and Yoshi are filling in at the Cookie Factory, and the snacks are piling high! As fresh-baked cookies roll out of the ovens, it's up to Mario to sort and stack 'em before they pile too high! Line up a row of the same kind of cookies either vertically or horizontally, and they vanish! Clear the screen to move on to a new level of cookie chaos. Yoshi appears from time to time to stir things up. Play for high score or go head-to-head against a friend or the computer. The mouth-watering madness doesn't let up!

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