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3DO Interactive Multiplayer

3DO Interactive Multiplayer

The 3DO Interactive Multiplayer (often called simply 3DO) is a video game console originally produced by Panasonic in 1993. Further renditions of the hardware were released in 1994 by Sanyo and Goldstar. The consoles were manufactured according to specifications created by The 3DO Company, and were originally designed by Dave Needle and RJ Mical of New Technology Group. The system was conceived by entrepreneur and Electronic Arts founder Trip Hawkins.

Aamber Pegasus

Aamber Pegasus

The Aamber Pegasus is a home computer designed by Technosys Research Labs. The computer was released in early 1981 in New Zealand for an unknown retail price. The computer was not released outside of New Zealand. The Pegasus sold around only 100 units when it was first released, due to the popularity of Apple II computers. The computers were manufactured until Technosys's collapse in late 1981.

Acorn Archimedes

Acorn Archimedes

The Acorn Archimedes is a family of personal computers designed by Acorn Computers Ltd. The first models were released in June 1987 in Europe at a retail price around £800. The computers were also released in Australia (1988) and in limited availability in North America (1990). The Archimedes computers were one of the most powerful available during the late 1980s and early 1990s. The computers were manufactured until an unspecified time in 1995.

Acorn Atom

Acorn Atom

The Acorn Atom is a home computer designed by Acorn Computers Ltd. The computer was released in 1980 in Europe at a retail price ranging from £120 to £200, depending on the package bought. The computer was not released outside of Europe. The Atom was Acorn's first computer to be aimed squarely at the home market. The computer was manufactured until an unspecified time in 1983.

Acorn Electron

Acorn Electron

The Acorn Electron is a home computer designed by Acorn Computers Ltd. The computer was released in August 1983 in Europe at a retail price of £175. The computer was not released outside of Europe. The Electron was a budget version of the BBC Micro educational/home computer, and for a short period, the Electron was reportedly the best selling micro in the United Kingdom. The computer was manufactured until an unspecified time in 1985.

Amstrad CPC

Amstrad CPC

The Amstrad Colour Personal Computer, better known as the Amstrad CPC, is a series of 8-bit home computers designed by Amstrad. The first models were released in April 1984 in Europe at a retail price ranging from £199 to £299, depending on the package bought. The computers were not released outside of Europe. The CPC series had five distinct models: The CPC464, CPC664, CPC6128, 464plus, and 6128plus. The computers were manufactured until an unspecified time in 1990.

Amstrad GX4000

Amstrad GX4000

The Amstrad GX4000, commonly known as the GX4000, is a third generation (1983-2003) video game console developed and distributed by Amstrad. It was released in September of 1990 in Europe at a retail price of £99.99. The console was not released outside Europe. The GX4000 was Amstrad's short-lived attempt to enter the games console market, being primarily a home computer manufacturer. The console was discontinued in late 1991.

Android

Android

Android is a mobile operating system (OS) based on the Linux kernel and currently developed by Google. With a user interface based on direct manipulation, Android is designed primarily for touchscreen mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet computers, with specialized user interfaces for televisions (Android TV), cars (Android Auto), and wrist watches (Android Wear). The OS uses touch inputs that loosely correspond to real-world actions, like swiping, tapping, pinching, and reverse pinching to manipulate on-screen objects, and a virtual keyboard. Despite being primarily designed for...

APF Imagination Machine

APF Imagination Machine

The APF Imagination Machine is a combination home video game console and computer system released by APF Electronics Inc. in late 1979. It was composed of two separate components, the APF-M1000 game system, and an add on docking bay with full sized typewriter keyboard and tape drive. The APF-M1000 was built specifically to compete with the Atari 2600.

Apogee BK-01

Apogee BK-01

The Apogee BK-01 or Apogey BK-01 is a Soviet 8-bit personal computer built on the Radio 86RK and released in 1988. Its later version, the Apogee BK-01C featured color support.

Apple II

Apple II

In 1976, computer pioneers Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs began selling their Apple I computer in kit form to computer stores. A month later, Wozniak was working on a design for an improved version, the Apple II. They demonstrated a prototype in December, and then introduced it to the public in April 1977. The Apple II started the boom in personal computer sales in the late 1970s, and pushed Apple into the lead among personal computer makers.

Apple IIGS

Apple IIGS

The Apple IIGS is a personal computer released by Apple Computer on September 15, 1986 that's compatible with the Apple II series, but otherwise has capabilities comparable to the Atari ST, Commodore Amiga, and Macintosh. The "GS" in the name stands for "Graphics" and "Sound," referring to its enhanced multimedia hardware, especially its state of the art sound and music synthesis. The machine is a radical departure from any previous Apple II, with its 16-bit processor, direct access to megabytes of RAM, and mouse. It's the first computer produced by Apple to use a color graphical user...

Apple iOS

Apple iOS

iOS (originally iPhone OS) is a mobile operating system created and developed by Apple Inc. and distributed exclusively for Apple hardware. It is the operating system that presently powers many of the company's mobile devices, including the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. Originally unveiled in 2007 for the iPhone, it has been extended to support other Apple devices such as the iPod Touch (September 2007), iPad (January 2010), iPad Mini (November 2012) and second-generation Apple TV onward (September 2010). As of January 2015, Apple's App Store contained more than 1.4 million iOS...

Apple Mac OS

Apple Mac OS

Mac OS is a series of graphical user interface–based operating systems developed by Apple Inc. for their Macintosh line of computer systems. The original operating system was first introduced in 1984 as being integral to the original Macintosh, and referred to as the "System". Referred to by its major revision starting with "System 6" and "System 7", Apple rebranded version 7.6 as "Mac OS" as part of their Macintosh clone program in 1996. The Macintosh, specifically its system software, is credited with having popularized the early graphical user interface concept. There have been two...

Arcade

Arcade

An arcade game or coin-op is a coin-operated entertainment machine typically installed in public businesses such as restaurants, bars and amusement arcades. Most arcade games are video games, pinball machines, electro-mechanical games, redemption games or merchandisers. While exact dates are debated, the golden age of arcade video games is usually defined as a period beginning sometime in the late 1970s and ending sometime in the mid-1980s. Excluding a brief resurgence in the early 1990s, the arcade industry subsequently declined in the Western hemisphere as competing home-based video game...

Atari 2600

Atari 2600

The Atari Video Computer System (VCS), later named the Atari 2600, is a second generation (1976–1992) home video game console developed and distributed by Atari, Inc. It was released on September 11, 1977 in North America at a retail price of $199. The console was later released in Europe (1978) and Japan (1983 - as the Atari 2800). The Atari 2600 popularized the use of microprocessor-based hardware and games contained on ROM cartridges. The console was discontinued on January 1, 1992.

Atari 5200

Atari 5200

The Atari 5200 SuperSystem, commonly known as the Atari 5200, is a second generation (1976–1992) video game console developed and distributed by Atari, Inc. It was released in November 1982 in North America at a retail price of $269. It was not released outside North America. The 5200's internal hardware was almost identical to Atari's 8-bit computers however it came with an innovative controller featuring a 360-degree non-centering joystick with a numeric keypad, start, pause, and reset buttons. The console was discontinued on May 21, 1984.

Atari 7800

Atari 7800

The Atari 7800 Pro System, commonly known as the Atari 7800, is a third generation (1983-2003) video game console developed and distributed by Atari Corporation. It was released in May 1986 in North America at a retail price of $79.95. The console was later released in Europe (1987). The 7800 is considered one of the first backward-compatible consoles as it could play Atari 2600 games without the use of additional modules. The console was discontinued on January 1, 1992.

Atari 800

Atari 800

The Atari 800 was announced in December 1978, though it didn't actually start shipping until late in 1979. Designed to look like a friendly typewriter, the Atari 800 is an expandable system with two easily accessable cartridge ports under a front cover, and a removable top with four expansion slots inside. The cartridges are very handy, just plug 'em in and go! Technologically, there's not much to them, just some ROM chips with the program already burned into them. The Atari 800 has multiple special purpose co-processors for sound and graphics to take the load off of the 6502 CPU, and it...

Atari Jaguar

Atari Jaguar

The Atari Jaguar is a fifth generation (1993–2005) video game console developed and distributed by Atari Corporation. It was released in November 1993 in North America at a retail price of $249.99. The console was later released in Europe (1994), Australia (1994), and Japan (1994). The Jaguar was marketed as being the first 64-bit video game console; however this claim was widely criticized. The console was discontinued in early 1996, possibly at the time of the company's sale on April 8, 1996.

Atari Jaguar CD

Atari Jaguar CD

The Atari Jaguar CD is a fifth generation (1993–2005) CD-ROM peripheral for the Atari Jaguar video game console developed and distributed by Atari Corporation. It was released in September 1995 in North America at a retail price of $149.95. The peripheral was also released in Europe (1995). The Jaguar CD unit featured a double-speed (2×) drive and its own cartridge slot to allow cartridge games to be played without removing the CD drive. The peripheral was discontinued in early 1996, possibly at the time of the company's sale on April 8, 1996.

Atari Lynx

Atari Lynx

The Atari Lynx is a 16-bit handheld game console that was developed and distributed by Atari Corporation. It was released in September 1989 in North America at a retail price of $149.95. The handheld was also released in Europe (1990) and Japan (1990). The Lynx was the world's first handheld electronic game with a color LCD screen. The console was discontinued in early 1996, possibly at the time of the company's sale on April 8, 1996.

Atari ST

Atari ST

The Atari ST is a line of home computers from Atari Corporation. The first models were released in June 1985 in North America at a retail price around $799.99 or $999.99, depending on the model. The computers were also released in limited availability in Europe (1985). The ST is the first personal computer to come with a bitmapped color GUI. The computers were manufactured until an unspecified time in 1993.

Atari XEGS

Atari XEGS

The Atari XE Video Game System, commonly known as the Atari XEGS, is a third generation (1983-2003) video game console developed and distributed by Atari Corporation. It was released in November 1987 in North America at a retail price of $199.99. The console was not released outside North America. The XEGS was able to operate as either a stand-alone console or full computer with the addition of its specially designed keyboard. The console was discontinued on January 1, 1992.

Bally Astrocade

Bally Astrocade

The Bally Astrocade, originally referred to as the Bally Home Library Computer, is a second generation (1976–1992) home video game console developed by Midway and distributed by Bally Manufacturing. It was released in late 1977 in North America at a retail price of $299. The console was not released outside North America. The Astrocade was known for having the most powerful graphics and sound capabilities for all consoles of it's era. The console was discontinued in mid to late 1983.

BBC Microcomputer System

BBC Microcomputer System

The British Broadcasting Corporation Microcomputer System, BBC Microcomputer System, or best known as the BBC Micro is a series of microcomputers designed by Acorn Computers Ltd. and distributed by the BBC. The first models were released in December 1981 in Europe for £235 or £335, depending on the model. The computers were also released in North America (1983). The computers were designed with an emphasis on education, and being more rugged then other brands. The computers were manufactured until an unspecified time in 1994.

Camputers Lynx

Camputers Lynx

The Lynx was an 8-bit British home computer that was first released in early 1983 as a 48 kB model. Several models were available with 48 kB, 96 kB or 128 kB RAM. It was possible to reach 192 kB with RAM expansions on board. John Shireff designed the hardware and Davis Jansons the firmware. The machine was based around a Z80A CPU clocked at 4 MHz, (6 MHz for the 128/192 kB models) and featured a Motorola 6845 as video controller. It was possible to run CP/M with the optional 5.25" floppy disk-drive on the 96 kB and 128 kB models Compared to, for example, the Commodore 64, the BASIC was...

Casio Loopy

Casio Loopy

The Casio Loopy, subtitled My Seal Computer SV-100, is a fifth generation (1993–2005) video game console developed and distributed by Casio. It was released on October 19, 1995 in Japan at a retail price believed to be 25,000¥. The console was not released outside Japan. The Loopy was marketed to females and included a built-in thermal color printer that could be used to create stickers from game screenshots. The console was discontinued in October 1996.

Casio PV-1000

Casio PV-1000

The Casio PV-1000, is a third generation (1983-2003) video game console developed and distributed by Casio. It was released in October 1983 in Japan at a retail price of 14,800¥. The console was not released outside Japan. The PV-1000 failed to achieve a significant market share, and thus only had 13 games released during it's life. The console was discontinued by early 1984.

Coleco ADAM

Coleco ADAM

The Coleco ADAM is a home computer, and expansion for the ColecoVision (port 3), released in 1983 by American toy manufacturer Coleco. It was an attempt to follow on the success of the company's ColecoVision video game console. The ADAM was not very successful, partly because of early production problems, and was orphaned in early 1985.

ColecoVision

ColecoVision

The ColecoVision is a second generation (1976–1992) home video game console developed and distributed by Coleco Industries. It was released in August 1982 in North America at a retail price of $175. The console was later released in Europe (1983). The ColecoVision offered a closer experience to arcade games than its competitors at the time. The console was discontinued in mid-1985.

Commodore 128

Commodore 128

The Commodore 128, also known as the C128, C-128, C=128, or occasionally CBM 128, is the last 8-bit home computer that was commercially released by Commodore Business Machines (CBM). Introduced in January 1985 at the CES in Las Vegas, it appeared three years after its predecessor, the bestselling Commodore 64.

Commodore 64

Commodore 64

The Commodore 64 is an 8-bit home computer introduced in January 1982 by Commodore International. It is listed in the Guinness World Records as the highest-selling single computer model of all time, with independent estimates placing the number sold between 10 and 17 million units. Volume production started in early 1982, marketing in August for US$595 (equivalent to $1,461 in 2015). Preceded by the Commodore VIC-20 and Commodore PET, the C64 took its name from its 64 kilobytes (65,536 bytes) of RAM. It had superior sound and graphical specifications compared to other earlier systems such as...

Commodore Amiga

Commodore Amiga

The Amiga is a family of personal computers marketed by Commodore in the 1980s and 1990s. The first model was launched in 1985 as a high-end home computer and became popular for its graphical, audio and multi-tasking abilities. The Amiga provided a significant upgrade from 8-bit computers, such as the Commodore 64, and the platform quickly grew in popularity among computer enthusiasts. The best selling model, the Amiga 500, was introduced in 1987 and became the leading home computer of the late 1980s and early 1990s in much of Western Europe

Commodore Amiga CD32

Commodore Amiga CD32

The Amiga CD32, styled "CD32" and code-named "Spellbound", is the first 32-bit home video game console released in western Europe, Australia, Canada and Brazil. It was first announced at the Science Museum in London on July 16, 1993, and was released in September of the same year. The CD32 uses CD-ROM media, and was developed by Commodore, creator of the Commodore Amiga computer. It was based on Commodore's Advanced Graphics Architecture chipset, and is of similar specification to the Amiga 1200 computer. Using third party devices, it is possible to upgrade the CD32 with keyboard, floppy...

Commodore CDTV

Commodore CDTV

The CDTV (an acronym for "Commodore Dynamic Total Vision", a backronym of an acronym for "Compact Disc Television", giving it a double meaning) is a multimedia platform developed by Commodore International and launched in March 1991. The CDTV was intended as a media appliance rather than a personal computer.

Commodore MAX Machine

Commodore MAX Machine

The Commodore MAX Machine, also known as Ultimax in the United States and VC-10 in Germany, was a home computer designed and sold by Commodore International in Japan, beginning in early 1982, a predecessor to the popular Commodore 64. The Commodore 64 manual mentions the machine by name, suggesting that Commodore intended to sell the machine internationally; however, it is unclear whether the machine was ever actually sold outside Japan. It is considered a rarity.

Commodore PET

Commodore PET

The Commodore PET (Personal Electronic Transactor) is a line of home/personal computers produced starting in 1977 by Commodore International. A top-seller in the Canadian and United States educational markets, it was Commodore's first full-featured computer, and formed the basis for their entire 8-bit product line, including the Commodore 64. The first model, which was named the PET 2001, was the first personal computer ever made available to retail consumers.

Commodore Plus 4

Commodore Plus 4

The Commodore Plus/4 is a home computer released by Commodore International in 1984. The "Plus/4" name refers to the four-application ROM resident office suite (word processor, spreadsheet, database, and graphing); it was billed as "the productivity computer with software built-in". Internally, the Plus/4 shares the same basic architecture as the lower-end Commodore 16 and 116 models, and is able to use software and peripherals designed for them. However, it is not compatible with the well-established Commodore 64. While the Plus/4 had some success in Europe, it was a failure in the United...

Commodore VIC-20

Commodore VIC-20

The VIC-20 (Germany: VC-20; Japan: VIC-1001) is an 8-bit home computer that was sold by Commodore Business Machines. The VIC-20 was announced in 1980, roughly three years after Commodore's first personal computer, the PET. The VIC-20 was the first computer of any description to sell one million units.

Dragon 32/64

Dragon 32/64

The Dragon 32 and Dragon 64 are home computers that were built in the 1980s. The Dragons are very similar to the TRS-80 Color Computer, and were produced for the European market by Dragon Data, Ltd., in Port Talbot, Wales, and for the US market by Tano of New Orleans, Louisiana. A broad range of peripherals exist for the Dragon 32/64, and on top of this there are add-ons such as the Dragon's Claw which give the Dragons access to the BBC Micro's large range of accessories (a particularly important factor in the UK home market). The Dragon uses analogue joysticks, unlike most systems of the...

EACA EG2000 Colour Genie

EACA EG2000 Colour Genie

The EACA EG2000 Colour Genie was a computer produced by Hong Kong-based manufacturer EACA and introduced in Germany in August 1982. It followed their earlier Video Genie I and II computers and was released around the same time as the business-oriented Video Genie III.

Elektronika BK

Elektronika BK

The Electronika BK was a series of 16-bit PDP-11-compatible Soviet home computers developed by NPO Scientific Center, the leading Soviet microcomputer design team at the time. It was also responsible for the more powerful UKNC and DVK micros. First released in 1984 (developed in 1983), they were based on the ?1801??1 (Soviet LSI-11-compatible CPU) and were the only "official" Soviet home computer design in mass production.

Emerson Arcadia 2001

Emerson Arcadia 2001

Emerson Arcadia 2001 was supposed to be the Atari 2600 killer. A great console with great games. Unfortunately they fell prey to complete lack of third party development and the lack of arcade game titles. Similar to other consoles before it, they were forced to release arcade clones.

Enterprise

Enterprise

The Enterprise (aka Elan) is a Zilog Z80-based home computer first produced in 1985. It was developed by British company Intelligent Software and marketed by Enterprise Computers. Its two variants are the Enterprise 64, with 64 kilobytes (kB) of Random Access Memory (RAM), and the Enterprise 128, with 128 kB of RAM.

Entex Adventure Vision

Entex Adventure Vision

The Adventurevision is a cartridge based tabletop video game system produced by Entex in 1982. The system has a rather unique built in LED display composed of a column of 40 LEDs and a spinning mirror that produced a display with a resolution of 150x40 pixels. Another product using this technique was produced by Nintendo in the mid 1990s–the Virtual Boy. Control is through a single multi-position joystick and two sets of four buttons, one on each side of the joystick, for ease of play by both left- and right-handed players. Four game cartridges can be stored in bays on top of the...

Epoch Game Pocket Computer

Epoch Game Pocket Computer

The Epoch Game Pocket Computer is a handheld game console released by Epoch in Japan in 1984. It was one of the very few truly handheld systems to be released in the early 1980s, preceding the Game Boy by 5 years. The Game Pocket Computer used an LCD screen with a 75 × 64 resolution,and could produce graphics at about the same level as early Atari 2600 games. The system was a failure in Japan, and as a result, only 5 games were made for it.

Epoch Super Cassette Vision

Epoch Super Cassette Vision

The Super Cassette Vision was released in 1984 as the successor to Epoch's Cassette Vision. The system was also manufactured and distributed for Europe (particularly France) by a company called ITMC. In Europe it was called the Yeno Super Cassette Vision. In 1985, Epoch decided to release a limited edition version called Lady Cassette Vision. The pink colored console came bundled with it's own carrying case and a game called Milky Princess.

Exelvision EXL 100

The EXL 100 of the French brand Exelvision is a microprocessor computer based on the TMS7020 from Texas Instruments. It was original for the time because almost all home computers in France were equipped with microprocessors of the series 6502 of MOS Technology or the Zilog Z80.

Exidy Sorcerer

Exidy Sorcerer

The Sorcerer is one of the early home computer systems, released in 1978 by the videogame company Exidy. It was comparatively advanced when released, especially when compared to the contemporary more commercially successful Commodore PET and TRS-80, but due to a number of problems, including a lack of marketing, the machine remained relatively unknown.

Fairchild Channel F

Fairchild Channel F

The Fairchild Channel F is a home video game console released by Fairchild Semiconductor in November 1976. It has the distinction of being the first programmable ROM cartridge–based video game console, and the first console to use a microprocessor. It was launched as the Video Entertainment System, or VES, but when Atari released their VCS the next year, Fairchild renamed it's machine.

Fujitsu FM Towns Marty

Fujitsu FM Towns Marty

The FM Towns Marty (Efu Emu Taunzu Mati) is a fifth-generation home video game console released in 1993 by Fujitsu, exclusively for the Japanese market. It was the first 32-bit home video game system, and came complete with a built in CD-ROM drive and disk drive.

Fujitsu FM-7

Fujitsu FM-7

The FM-7 ("Fujitsu Micro 7") is a home computer created by Fujitsu, first released in 1982, only sold in Japan. It is a stripped down version of their earlier FM-8; during development, the FM-7 was known as the "FM-8 Jr.".

Funtech Super Acan

Funtech Super Acan

The Super Acan is a home video game console that was released exclusively in Taiwan in 1995 by Funtech. Inside is a Motorola 68000, also used in the Sega Genesis and Neo Geo. Twelve games have been confirmed to exist for the system.

Game Wave Family Entertainment System

Game Wave Family Entertainment System

The Game Wave Family Entertainment System is a hybrid DVD player and video game console. It was first released in Canada in October 2005. It is part of the seventh generation of gaming. It was released in the United States at an MSRP of $99. The Game Wave saved manufacturing costs by adding an Altera MAX II Complex Programmable Logic Device to an inexpensive DVD player. It was packaged with the pack-in game 4 Degrees: The Arc of Trivia, Vol. 1 (later changed to Veggie Tales: Veg-Out! Family Tournament).

GamePark GP32

GamePark GP32

The GP32 (GamePark 32) is a handheld game console developed by the Korean company Game Park. It was released on November 23, 2001, in South Korea only.

GameWave

GCE Vectrex

GCE Vectrex

The GCE Vectrex, usually just referred to as Vectrex, is a second generation (1976–1992) home video game console that was developed by Western Technologies/Smith Engineering, and distributed first by General Consumer Electronics (GCE), and later by Milton Bradley Company after its purchase of GCE. It was released in November 1982 in North America at a retail price of $199. The console was later released in Europe (1983) and Japan (1983). The Vectrex had an integrated vector monitor which displayed vector graphics, which set it apart from other consoles that needed a TV to play on. The console...

Hartung Game Master

The Game Master is a handheld game console manufactured by Hartung, and designed to compete with the Nintendo Game Boy. In Germany it was marketed by Hartung itself, while in the UK it was released as the Systema 2000 by already well established maker of cheap LCD games Systema. It was also sold under alternate names in other countries, including Super Game and Game Tronic. The Game Master has a 64 x 64 monochrome LCD screen capable of displaying graphics on par with the Atari 2600.

Hector HRX

The Hector HRX follows the 2HR, and takes over exactly the same machine, while technically stretching it on certain points. The main evolution comes from the amount of RAM that goes to 64 KB, allowing it to display double the number of colors on screen. The machine also now has a cartridge port, which ultimately was used very little, mostly only near the end of its life. It is indeed the last machine of the French firm for the Victor / Hector range.

Interton VC 4000

Interton VC 4000

The VC 4000 is an early 8-bit cartridge-based home video game console released in Germany in 1978 by Interton. The console is quite obscure outside Germany, but many software-compatible systems can be found in many European countries.

Jupiter Ace

The Jupiter Ace was a British home computer of the early 1980s, produced by a company set up for the purpose, named Jupiter Cantab. The Ace differed from other microcomputers of the time in that it used Forth instead of the more common BASIC.

Linux

is a name that broadly denotes a family of free and open-source software operating systems (OS) built around the Linux kernel. Typically, Linux is packaged in a form known as a Linux distribution (or distro for short) for both desktop and server use. The defining component of a Linux distribution is the Linux kernel, an operating system kernel first released on September 17, 1991, by Linus Torvalds. Many Linux distributions use the word "Linux" in their name. The Free Software Foundation uses the name GNU/Linux to refer to the operating system family, as well as specific distributions, to...

Lviv PC-01

The Lviv PC-01 was an i8080 clone first introduced in the city of Lviv in the Soviet Union. The PC-01 started to appear in computer shops in 1987 but was in development since the early 1980s.

Magnavox Odyssey

Magnavox Odyssey

The Magnavox Odyssey is a first generation (1972–1980) home video game console developed and distributed by Magnavox. It was released in September 1972 in North America at a retail price of $99. The console was later released in Europe (1973). The Odyssey is the known to be the first commercial home video game console. The console was discontinued sometime in 1975.

Magnavox Odyssey 2

The Magnavox Odyssey 2 is a second generation (1976–1992) home video game console developed and distributed by Magnavox. It was released in February 1979 in North America at a retail price of $179. The console was also released in Europe (1979), and later South America (1983), and Japan (1982). The Odyssey 2 included a full alphanumeric membrane keyboard, which was to be used for educational games, selecting options, or programming. The console was discontinued on March 20, 1984.

Matra and Hachette Alice

The Matra & Hachette Ordinateur Alice was a home computer sold in France beginning in 1983. It was a clone of the TRS-80 MC-10, produced through a collaboration between Matra and Hachette in France and Tandy Corporation in the United States. The Alice is distinguished by its unique, bright red casing. Functionally, it is equivalent to the MC-10, with a Péritel (SCART) connector replacing the RF modulator for video output.Unlike its progenitor, the Alice became a popular computer in its home country, aided by its presence in schools as part of the country's Informatique pour tous ("Information...

Mattel Aquarius

The Mattel Aquarius was the first and only genuine home computer offered by Mattel Electronics. Mattel did not start by designing a computer. It instead began by looking around for a pre-made computer system it could market under its name. It discovered that one of its manufacturing partners, the Hong Kong based Radofin Electronics Far East, had already designed a three-system line of home computers. All Mattel had to do was secure the U.S. marketing rights, which it promptly did for the first two units in the line, and have Radofin handle the manufacturing.

Mattel HyperScan

The HyperScan is a video game console from Mattel. It uses radio frequency identification (RFID) along with traditional video game technology. It was marketed toward boys between the ages of five and nine who were not ready for high-end video games in terms of maturity or expense, though the included game was rated "T" by the ESRB, and the remaining titles were "E10+". The console used UDF format CD-ROMs. The HyperScan has two controller ports, as well as a 13.56 MHz RFID scanner that reads and writes to the "cards" which, in turn, activate features in and save data from the game. Players are...

Mattel HyperScan

The HyperScan is a video game console from the toy company Mattel. It uses radio frequency identification (RFID) along with traditional video game technology. The included game was rated "T" and the remaining titles were rated "E10+", by the ESRB, despite this, it was marketed toward boys between the ages of five and nine who were not ready for high-end video games in terms of maturity or expense. The console used UDF format CD-ROMs. The HyperScan has two controller ports, as well as a 13.56 MHz RFID scanner that reads and writes to the "cards" which, in turn, activate features in and save...

Mattel Intellivision

Mattel Intellivision

The Mattel Intellivision is a second generation (1976–1992) home video game console developed and distributed by Mattel Electronics. It was released in summer 1979 in North America at a retail price of $299. The console was later released in Europe (1981), South America (1982), and Japan (1982). The Intellivision was the first home console to use a tile based playfield and was the first game console to provide real-time human voices in the middle of gameplay, courtesy of the IntelliVoice module. The console was discontinued in early-1990.

Mega Duck

The Mega Duck WG-108 (also known as Cougar Boy) is a handheld game console that was produced by Hong Kong-based Welback Holdings through its Timlex International division and came on the market in 1993.

Memotech MTX512

Like many of the other computers at the time, including the Sinclair ZX range, Memotech computers were based on the Zilog Z80 8-bit microprocessor. The computers were originally available in two models, the MTX500 with 32KBytes of RAM and the MTX512 with 64KBytes of RAM. The MTX500 was launched at the Earls Court Computer Fair in June 1983 and the MTX512 was available later in the year. The final machine from Memotech Computers, released in September 1984, was the RS128. The RS128 was fitted with 128 KBytes of RAM and used page switching to get around the Z80 restriction of only being able...

Microsoft MSX

MSX is the name of a standardized home computer architecture, first announced by Microsoft on June 16, 1983.

Microsoft MSX2

The MSX2 was the second generation of the MSX1 standard, unofficially also known as "MSX2", released by Microsoft in 1985.

Microsoft MSX2+

After 1986, Microsoft stopped with supporting MSX and ASCII in Japan took over further development of the MSX system. Due to ASCII's lack of interest in European market the MSX2+ was never manufactured and sold outside Japan. Rumours and plans existed in the Netherlands to make a European MSX2+, but they never came to reality.

Microsoft Xbox

Microsoft Xbox

The Microsoft Xbox is a sixth generation (1998–2013) home video game console developed and distributed by Microsoft. It was released on November 15, 2001 in North America at a retail price of $299.99. The console was later released in Europe (2002), Japan (2002), and Australia (2002). The Xbox was the first game console to have a built in hard disk. The console was discontinued on March 2, 2009.

Microsoft Xbox 360

Microsoft Xbox 360

The Microsoft Xbox 360 is a seventh generation (2005–2017) home video game console developed and distributed by Microsoft. It was released on November 22, 2005 in North America at a retail price of $299.99 or $399.99, depending on the model. The console was later released in Europe (2005), Japan (2005), South America (2006), and Australia (2006). The Xbox 360 was known for its graphical power at the time, as well as defining controller free gameplay via the Kinect device. The console was discontinued on April 20, 2017.

Microsoft Xbox One

Microsoft Xbox One

The Microsoft Xbox One is an eighth generation (2012-present) home video game console developed and distributed by Microsoft. It was released on November 22, 2013 in North America at a retail price of $499.99. The console was simultaneously released in Europe (2013), South America (2013), Australia (2013) and later Japan (2014). The Xbox One is marketed as an all-in-one entertainment system, providing games, movies, music, and web browsing from the console. As of this date, the console is still in production.

MS-DOS

MS-DOS

MS-DOS, short for Microsoft Disk Operating System, was an operating system for x86-based personal computers mostly developed by Microsoft. It was the most commonly used member of the DOS family of operating systems, and was the main operating system for IBM PC compatible personal computers during the 1980s to the mid-1990s, when it was gradually superseded by operating systems offering a graphical user interface (GUI), in various generations of the Microsoft Windows operating system.

MUGEN

M.U.G.E.N (also written as Mugen, MUGEN and M.U.G.E.N.) is a freeware 2D fighting game engine designed by Elecbyte. Content is created by the community, and thousands of fighters, both original and from popular fiction, have been created. It is written in C and originally used the Allegro library. The latest versions of the engine now use the SDL library.

Namco System 22

History The Namco System 22 is the successor to the Namco System 21 arcade system board co-designed with the assistance of graphics & simulation experts Evans & Sutherland. It was first released in 1993 with the game Ridge Racer. It was essentially a continuation of the System 21 hardware design, where the main CPU provides a scene description to a bank of DSP chips which perform all necessary 3D calculations. Additional graphical improvements included texture mapping, Gouraud shading, transparency effects, and depth cueing thanks to the Evans & Sutherland 'TR3' chip/chipset, which stands...

NEC PC-8801

The NEC PC8801 was the followup from the NEC PC8001. It was distributed in west Europe by NEC Neuss Germany. These even manufactured computer furniture to be bought by complete systems. In the U.K. this was also a well know model in the marked of office equipment. The PC8801 had 2 basic interpretors in ROM, at first the bill gates written N-basic from Microsoft and second the very special Microsoft N-88 basic with extended commands for graphics etc. You could load CP/M operating system by discette. At first the CP/M from the PC8001 computer, and later also CP/M in PC8801 mode. In GB was at...

NEC PC-9801

The PC-9800 series, commonly shortened to PC-98, is a lineup of Japanese 16-bit and 32-bit personal computers manufactured by NEC from 1982 through 2000. The platform established NEC's dominance in the Japanese personal computer market, and by 1999, more than 18 million PC-98 units had been sold. The first model, the PC-9801, was launched on October 1982, and employed an 8086 CPU. It ran at a clock speed of 5 MHz, with two µPD7220 display controllers (one for text, the other for video graphics), and shipped with 128 KB of RAM, expandable to 640 KB. Its 8-color display had a maximum resolution...

NEC PC-FX

The PC-FX is a 32-bit home video game console made by NEC Home Electronics. It was released in Japan on December 23, 1994, just weeks after Sony's PlayStation and a month after the Sega Saturn. It is the successor to the PC Engine (and its many add-ons), known as TurboGrafx-16 in North America. Unlike its predecessors the PC-FX was only released in Japan. The console is shaped like a tower PC and was meant to be similarly upgradeable. However the PC-FX lacked a 3D polygon-based graphics chip that rendered the system underpowered in comparison to its competitors. It was also expensive and...

NEC TurboGrafx-16

TurboGrafx-16, fully titled as TurboGrafx-16 Entertainment SuperSystem and known in Japan as the PC Engine, is a video game console developed by Hudson Soft and NEC, released in Japan on October 30, 1987, and in North America on August 29, 1989.

NEC TurboGrafx-CD

The TurboGrafx-CD is an add on for the TurboGrafx-16. It was released to expand the library of games of the TurboGrafx 16.

Nintendo 3DS

Nintendo 3DS

The Nintendo 3DS, abbreviated to 3DS, is a portable game console produced by Nintendo. It is capable of displaying stereoscopic 3D effects without the use of 3D glasses or additional accessories. Nintendo announced the device in March 2010 and officially unveiled it at E3 2010 on June 15, 2010. The console succeeds the Nintendo DS, featuring backward compatibility with older Nintendo DS and Nintendo DSi video games.

Nintendo 64

Nintendo 64

Named for its 64-bit central processing unit, it was released in June 1996 in Japan, September 1996 in North America, March 1997 in Europe and Australia, September 1997 in France and December 1997 in Brazil. As part of the fifth generation of gaming, the N64 competed primarily with the PlayStation and the Sega Saturn. The Nintendo 64 was launched with three games: Super Mario 64 and Pilotwings 64, released worldwide; and Saikyo Habu Shogi, released only in Japan. While the N64 was succeeded by Nintendo's MiniDVD-based GameCube in November 2001, N64 consoles remained available until the...

Nintendo 64DD

Nintendo 64DD

The 64DD, colloquially referred to as the Nintendo 64DD, is a magnetic disk drive peripheral for the Nintendo 64 game console developed by Nintendo. It was originally announced in 1995, prior to the Nintendo 64's 1996 launch, and after numerous delays was finally released only in Japan on December 1, 1999. Only ten software titles were released until the unit was discontinued in February 2001. It was a commercial failure, with at least 15,000 total units sold and another 85,000 units unsold.

Nintendo DS

Nintendo DS

The Nintendo DS or simply, DS, is a 32-bit dual-screen handheld game console developed and released by Nintendo. The device went on sale in North America on November 21, 2004. The DS, short for "Developers' System" or "Dual Screen", introduced distinctive new features to handheld gaming: two LCD screens working in tandem (the bottom one featuring a touchscreen), a built-in microphone, and support for wireless connectivity. Both screens are encompassed within a clamshell design similar to the Game Boy Advance SP. The Nintendo DS also features the ability for multiple DS consoles to directly...

Nintendo Entertainment System

Nintendo Entertainment System

The Nintendo Entertainment System is an 8-bit video game console that was released by Nintendo in North America during 1985, in Europe during 1986 and Australia in 1987. In most of Asia, including Japan (where it was first launched in 1983), China, Vietnam, Singapore, the Middle East and Hong Kong, it was released as the Family Computer, commonly shortened as either the romanized contraction Famicom, or abbreviated to FC. In South Korea, it was known as the Hyundai Comboy, and was distributed by Hynix which then was known as Hyundai Electronics.

Nintendo Famicom Disk System

Nintendo Famicom Disk System

The Family Computer Disk System, sometimes shortened as the Famicom Disk System or simply the Disk System, and abbreviated as the FDS or FCD, is a peripheral for Nintendo's Family Computer home video game console, released in Japan on February 21, 1986. It uses proprietary floppy disks called "Disk Cards" for data storage. Through its entire production span, 1986–2003, 4.44 million units were sold. The device is connected to the Famicom deck by plugging a special cartridge known as the RAM Adapter into the system's cartridge port, and attaching that cartridge's cable to the disk drive. The...

Nintendo Game & Watch

The Game & Watch series are a total of 60 handheld electronic games produced by Nintendo from 1980 to 1991. Created by game designer Gunpei Yokoi, each Game & Watch features a single game to be played on an LCD screen in addition to a clock, an alarm, or both. This console inspired Nintendo to make the Game Boy. It was the earliest Nintendo product to gain major success.

Nintendo Game Boy

Nintendo Game Boy

The Game Boy is an 8-bit handheld video game console developed and manufactured by Nintendo. It was released in Japan on April 21, 1989, in North America in August 1989, and in Europe in 1990. In Southern Asia, it is known as the "Tata Game Boy" It is the first handheld console in the Game Boy line. It was created by Gunpei Yokoi and Nintendo's Research and Development — the same staff who had designed the Game & Watch series as well as several popular games for the NES. The Game Boy was Nintendo's second handheld system following the Game & Watch series introduced in 1980, and it combined...

Nintendo Game Boy Advance

Nintendo Game Boy Advance

The Game Boy Advance (abbreviated as GBA) is a 32-bit handheld video game console developed, manufactured and marketed by Nintendo as the successor to the Game Boy Color. It was released in Japan on March 21, 2001, in North America on June 11, 2001, in Australia and Europe on June 22, 2001, and in mainland China on June 8, 2004 (iQue Player). Nintendo's competitors in the handheld market at the time were the Neo Geo Pocket Color, WonderSwan, GP32, Tapwave Zodiac, and the N-Gage. Despite the competitors' best efforts, Nintendo maintained a majority market share with the Game Boy Advance. As of...

Nintendo Game Boy Color

Nintendo Game Boy Color

The Game Boy Color, (abbreviated as GBC) is a handheld game console manufactured by Nintendo, which was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan and was released in November of the same year in international markets. It is the successor of the Game Boy. The Game Boy Color, as suggested by the name, features a color screen, but no backlight. It is slightly thicker and taller than the Game Boy Pocket, which is a redesigned Game Boy released in 1996. As with the original Game Boy, it has a custom 8-bit processor somewhat related to a Zilog Z80 central processing unit (CPU). The original name - with...

Nintendo GameCube

Nintendo GameCube

The Nintendo GameCube was the first Nintendo console to use optical discs as its primary storage medium. In contrast with the GameCube's contemporary competitors, Sony's PlayStation 2, Sega's Dreamcast and Microsoft's Xbox, the GameCube uses mini DVD-based discs instead of full-size DVDs. Partially as a result of this, it does not have the DVD-Video playback functionality of these systems, nor the audio CD playback ability of other consoles that use full-size optical discs.

Nintendo Pokemon Mini

The Pokémon Mini is a handheld game console that was designed and manufactured by Nintendo and themed around the Pokémon media franchise. It is the smallest game system with interchangeable cartridges ever produced by Nintendo, weighing just under two and a half ounces (70 grams). It was first released in North America on November 16, 2001, then in Japan on December 14, 2001, and in Europe on March 15, 2002. The systems were released in three colors: Wooper Blue, Chikorita Green, and Smoochum Purple. Features of the Pokémon mini include an internal real-time clock, an infrared port used to...

Nintendo Satellaview

The Satellaview is a satellite modem peripheral for Nintendo's Super Famicom system that was released in Japan in 1995. Available for pre-release orders beginning February 13, 1995, the Satellaview retailed for between ¥14,000 and 18,000 (at the time between USD$141 and 182) and came bundled with the BS-X Game Pak and an 8M Memory Pak. The Satellaview system was developed and released by Nintendo to receive signals broadcast from satellite TV station WOWOW's satellite radio subsidiary, St.GIGA. St.GIGA was responsible for file server management, maintenance, and vocalization for "SoundLink"...

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