After Burner

After Burner

After Burner (???????? Afuta Bana?) is a 1987 combat flight simulator arcade game by Sega AM2.[1] It is one of the first games designed by Yu Suzuki. The player flew an F-14 using a specialized joystick (with moving seat, in some installations), and...

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Name After Burner
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Platform Sinclair ZX Spectrum
Release Date 1988
Game Type Released
ESRB Not Rated
Developers Focus Creative Enterprises Ltd, Foursfield, Software Studios
Publishers Activision Inc
Genres Shooter
Max Players 1
Cooperative No
Rating

Community Rating: 4.25
Total Votes: 16
Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/After_Burner
Video Link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CLWQIow7rRQ
Overview
After Burner (???????? Afuta Bana?) is a 1987 combat flight simulator arcade game by Sega AM2.[1] It is one of the first games designed by Yu Suzuki. The player flew an F-14 using a specialized joystick (with moving seat, in some installations), and the game spawned several sequels. The game allows the player to control a F-14 Tomcat jet, which must destroy a series of enemy jets throughout 18 stages. At the start of the game, the player takes off from an aircraft carrier called the SEGA Enterprise, which shares a similar name to the one used in the 1986 film Top Gun. In the arcade version, the jet itself employs a machine gun and a limited set of heat-seeking missiles, in the Mastersystem version there is an unlimted amount of missiles. These weapons are replenished by another aircraft after beating a few stages. The aircraft, cannon and missile buttons are all controlled from an integrated flight stick. The game itself was released in two variations: a standard upright cabinet and a rotating cockpit version. In the cockpit version, the seat rotated horizontally, and the cockpit rotated vertically. The rotating cockpit version also featured two speakers inside the cockpit at head-level, which produced excellent stereo sound that significantly added to the gameplay experience. Both cabinets contained a grey monitor frame with flashing lights at the top that indicated an enemy's "lock" on your craft.
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