Sears, Roebuck and Co.

3-D Tic-Tac-Toe

3-D Tic-Tac-Toe

Atari 2600 - Released - June 1, 1980

The game is similar to the traditional game of tic-tac-toe, but is played on four 4×4 grids stacked vertically; it is basically a computerized version of the board game Qubic using traditional tic-tac-toe notation and layout. To win, a player must place four of their symbols on four squares that line up vertically, horizontally, or diagonally, on a single grid, or spaced evenly over all four grids. This creates a total of 76 possible ways to win, in comparison to eight possible ways to win on a standard 3×3 board. The game has nine variations: it can be played by two players against each...

Basic Math

Basic Math

Atari 2600 - Released - September 11, 1977

Basic Math is a math game for children. Each game gives the player a set of ten basic math problems (i.e. simple addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division) to solve. The player is presented with two numbers and a function, then inputs the answer by cycling through numbers with the joystick. A timer option is available to ramp up the difficulty. The game has eight primary game settings - basically two settings for each mathematical function. Games 1-4 allow the player to select one of the numbers the player will be working with, while 5-8 give random questions.

Bowling

Bowling

Atari 2600 - Released - 1978

Your objective is to roll as high a score as possible, whether you're playing a one-player or a two-player game. There are ten "pins" to knock down. You have two tries (or rolls) to knock down the pins each time you're up. Each game consists of ten "frames" (or turns). If you succeed in knocking down all the pins on your first roll, it's called a "strike". A strike is marked with an "x" on the TV screen. If you leave pins standing, but "pick them up" on your second try, it's called a "spare". Spares are marked with a "/" on the screen. An "open frame" occurs when you fail to...

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