Dave Nutting Associates

280 Zzzap + Dodgem

280 Zzzap + Dodgem

Bally Astrocade - January 1, 1978

The title was named after the US advertising campaign for the Datsun 280Z. Players can drive up to 200 miles per hour (320 km/h) while navigating a tricky road course at night. Players must watch out for treacherous turns, nasty competitors, and the ever-present time limit. It is one of the earliest games, if not the earliest, with authorized branding.

Datsun 280 Zzzap

Datsun 280 Zzzap

Arcade - September 1, 1976

The game is a simple black and white monochrome driving game. You control a car through a night time scene, and the road is represented by simple posts at the edges. The top of the screen will display information about upcoming curves (like the maximum safe speed to take them at), while the bottom of the screen has a speedometer, timer, scoreboard, and may also display a few tips as well. Just drive, and don't crash. Pay attention to your speed on the corners to avoid crashing.

Football

Football

Bally Astrocade - October 1, 1978

Complete a pass up the middle for a first down. Eight offensive play options including the end run, screen pass, long bomb, short or long passes up the middle and some elegant razzle dazzle. Offensive players have direct control of the cornerbacks. The computer controls the rest! Up to 4 players.

The Incredible Wizard

The Incredible Wizard

Bally Astrocade - January 1, 1982

Wizard of Wor is an arcade shooter played from a top-down point of view. The Bally Astrocade release of the game was titled The Incredible Wizard. It had the game ref number 2017 as a suffix. The player controls a warrior who is trapped in a dungeon. The goal is to earn as many points as possible by shooting the numerous enemy creatures which wander about the maze like corridors. The creatures wander about at various speeds, may shoot darts at the player, and some even have the ability to disappear temporarily. At the bottom of the screen the player has a radar which can be used to locate...

Sea Wolf

Sea Wolf

Arcade - Released - March 1, 1976

Sea Wolf is an arcade game by Midway, originally released in 1976. It was a video game update of an earlier coin-operated electro-mechanical (em) Midway game, Sea Devil, itself based on Sega's 1966 coin-op electro-mechanical arcade submarine simulator Periscope. Midway's video game version was designed by Dave Nutting and eventually sold 10,000 video game arcade cabinets. A color sequel, Sea Wolf II, was released in 1978 that sold another 4,000 units.

Star Battle

Star Battle

Bally Astrocade - January 1, 1979

Star Battle is a space shooter based on the trench run sequence from the original Star Wars movie. The game is for one or two players and involves a battle between an X-Wing and a Tie Fighter, although since it doesn't carry a license they are not called that. The X-Wing is controlled by player one while the Tie Fighter is controlled by player two or the computer. Before starting out a maximum score (1-999) is entered and the player that first reaches it wins the game. A single hit is enough to bring down the enemy ship and it is worth one point. The game is viewed from a third-person...

Tornado Baseball

Tornado Baseball

Arcade - Released - June 5, 1976

The game is a very simple game of baseball, implemented with stick figures. The game is very simple in terms of rules, and anybody can pick up on how to play fairly quickly. This is a two player only title, with both people playing for a single quarter. The pitching player selects his pitch with one joystick, while moving his outfielders with a second one. The batting player only has a single button (that is a 'swing' button). Both players use the same set of controls, so they must switch spots in front of the machine midway through each inning. You get a four inning game for one quarter,...

Wizard of Wor

Wizard of Wor

Arcade - Released - December 1, 1980

The players' characters, called Worriors, must kill all the monsters by shooting them. Player one has yellow Worriors, on the right, and player two has blue Worriors, on the left. In a two-player game, the players are also able to shoot each other's Worriors, earning bonus points and causing the other player to lose a life. Team-oriented players can successfully advance through the game by standing back-to-back (such as in a corner) and firing at anything that comes at them. Each dungeon consists of a single-screen rectangular grid with walls and corridors in various formations. The...

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