Acornsoft

A Question of Sport

A Question of Sport

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1988

A Qusetion of Sport is a sports trivia game based on the long running BBC quiz show of the same name. It was developed by Elite Systems and published by Superior Software / Acornsoft. Two teams of three battle against each other by answering sports questions. 2 Points are awarded for answering your question correctly. If you answer incorrectly the opposing team get a chance to answer it but for only 1 point. There are 6 rounds including picture board, what happened next and a quickfire buzzers round. Contestants are displayed as digitized faces and each contestant specialises in a certain sport. Team captains get to choose which sport they wish to specialise in from a choice of ten. There are 5 question blocks so that if questions start to repeat you can load the next one to extend gameplay life. After the last round the scores are totted up and the winner is the team with the most points.

Acheton

Acheton

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1984

Acheton was written by Jon Thackray, David Seal and Jonathan Partington. The BBC Micro version was originally published by Acornsoft in 1984 and re-released in 1987 by Topologika. Acheton is a home computer conversion of the mainframe adventure of the same name. Similar to Zork (which was released on the VAX mainframe not long before Acheton's original appearance), it is a fantasy treasure hunt set in a claustrophobic dungeon. It boasts over 400 rooms and 200 objects, thereby making it much bigger than Zork. As with many games of this kind the most time is spent by exploring the environment and solving item-based puzzles. Everything is described solely with plain text and the player interacts with the game by typing in phrases which describe his desired action, e.g. "take bottle". It also features a help function with graded hints.

Adventures

Adventures

Acorn Atom - Released - 1981

Adventures comprises the Adventure program plus three adventure games: DUNGEON Search for treasure in a maze of interconnected caverns, tunnels and caves, inhabited by friendly and unfriendly monsters. Find treasure and take it to the Throne Room. HOUSE You start on the doorstep of a haunted house, in whose rooms lurk the ghosts of some familiar people. Find treasure and take it to the Grand Banqueting Hall. INTERGALACTIC You play the part of an intergalactic traveller. Battle against the inhabitants of alien planets and return home to Earth with treasure.

Air Supremacy

Air Supremacy

Acorn Archimedes - Released - 1991

Air Supremacy is a polygonal three-dimensional flight game by Superior Software released in North America in 1991.Published by Acorn-software for the Archimedes the game's title refers to the a position in war where a side holds complete control of air warfare and air power over opposing forces. Along with games such as Repton,2, 3 Overdrive, Citadel, Thrust, Galaforce; Air Supremacy, with it's advanced 3D Texture mapping and polygonial graphics flew Superior Software to the forefront of the Archimedes and BBC publishing scene. Air Supremacy is a sort of cross between Zarch and Conqueror in that the player can fly in the air and move around on the ground as well. The object of each mission is to destroy all the enemy craft on each level. You start the game being the surface unit, however you can switch to the aircraft when you are on an airfield, and you can now start blowing up everything in your path.

Amoeba

Acorn Atom - Released - 1981

Arcade Action

Arcade Action

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1982

Arcade Action is a collection of four games. Space Invaders is a one or two player game and the other three are single player. Breakout: A musical version of an all-time favourite where you knock bricks out of a multi-coloured wall. There are seven variations on the standard game, including progressive walls and captive balls. Dodgems: Your racing car has to outwit the computerised car, which is programmed to crash into you. You have the advantage of acceleration, but must keep switching lanes to avoid a head-on collision. Snake: Guide the hungry snake towards its prey, and watch it grow as it consumes different kinds of food. The idea of the game is to score as many points as possible while preventing the snake from bumping into itself or the walls as it gets longer and longer. Space Invaders: Fight off the waves of advancing aliens while dodging behind four shelters to avoid being hit by their missiles. The closer they get, the faster they move, and the thicker the hail of missile fire. In full colour. complete with sound effects and hi-score.

Arcadians

Arcadians

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1982

If Acornsoft hadn't stretched the boundaries of IP infringement we would not have arcade perfect conversions such as Arcadians (a thinly veiled Namco arcade Galaxians clone). In addition to the perfectly replicated gameplay, it also features an arcade-style high score table and a novel attract mode screen with a demo of it being played, just like a real cabinet, making it feel really authentic. Arcadians was programmed by Nick Pelling aka Orlando.

Arcadians

Arcadians

Acorn Electron - Released - 1983

Arcadians is based on the arcade game Galaxian. You control a spacecraft at the bottom of the screen, moving left or right, blasting aliens moving in formation above. As you blast the aliens, some will swoop down in groups dropping bombs. You can avoide or shoot at these. If you are touched by an alien or it's bombs then you lose one of three lives and once the aliens have all been destroyed then you attempt to destroy them again. Two players can play and each player takes it in turns when the other player loses a life.

Around the World in 40 Screens

Around the World in 40 Screens

Acorn Electron - Released - 1987

Around the World in 40 Screens is the first of three standalone expansion packs for Repton 3. As the title might indicate it includes 40 new levels made in the map editor that was included with the original game. The game features a world travelling theme and the levels are divided into five sets each representing a specific setting. These are: America, Arctic, Orient, Oceans and Africa. The gameplay is the same as in Repton 3 but all objects have been replaced with objects related to the setting. Instead of diamonds, there are for example hamburgers in the American levels and fish in the Arctic levels. Boulders have been replaced by coconuts in African levels and snowmen in Arctic levels and so on. Enemies include Indians and bandits in the American levels, polar bears and penguins in the Arctic levels and octopuses and squids in the Ocean level. Repton himself has a different role in each setting. In America he is a sheriff while in the Arctic he is an eskimo and in the Orient he is a kung-fu master.

Asteroids

Acorn Atom - Released - 1980

The objective of Asteroids is to destroy asteroids and saucers. The player controls a triangular ship that can rotate left and right, fire shots straight forward, and thrust forward. Once the ship begins moving in a direction, it will continue in that direction for a time without player intervention unless the player applies thrust in a different direction. The ship eventually comes to a stop when not thrusting. The player can also send the ship into hyperspace, causing it to disappear and reappear in a random location on the screen, at the risk of self-destructing or appearing on top of an asteroid

Atom Chess

Atom Chess

Acorn Atom - Released - 1981

A chess program for the Acorn Atom released in 1981 by Acornsoft on cassette. Atom Chess was an improved version of Chessnut by Geoffrey Bulmer which competed at the 2nd European Microcomputer Chess Championship. Atom Chess recognizes all legal chess moves, including castling, en passant, and promotes to queen only. The program uses pure coordinates for game notation and entering moves, allows to manually set up positions, and features 6 levels of play.

Aviator

Aviator

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1983

Aviator was programmed by Geoff Crammond. Although it displayed in only black and white (a four colours version was also released) and had few of the features of modern simulators for more powerful computers, Aviator was of unparalleled quality at the time of its release, with a realistic flight model that included g-forces that could tear the wings off in a dive. The landscape was crudely rendered, and was basically a plane. Some scenic features were drawn as vector graphics, including low hills, fields, a lake, a suspension bridge over a river, and a small town which comprised a cluster of three buildings. Bonus points could be earned for flying under the bridge or along the main street of the town at a lower altitude than the buildings. Double points were earned for performing these stunts upside down. The game also had a shoot-'em-up mode in which alien vessels were seeded in the fields,feeding on the crops and growing until they could become airborne, at which point they headed for the town. The player could destroy the aliens on the ground as they fed, or (for reduced points) tackle them in the air (the aliens were agile but could not return fire). If an alien reached the town, the game was lost.

Baron

Baron

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1989

The King, on hearing news that his old friend the wizard had been imprisoned by the evil Baron, sends an army forth to rescue him. The young Prince Jason was left behind, but eager to help, he took a short cut and landed in trouble inside the Baron's forbidding castle. The wizard can be rescued by finding four objects belonging to him (Book of Spells, Wand, Crystal Ball and Ring) and taking them to his cell. There are 133 screens with 49 objects. You can carry only two objects at a time and the objects can only be dropped on the coloured bases, You must also get past various animals and the guards.

Black Box and Gambit

Black Box and Gambit

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1984

Two strategy games for up to four players. In Black Box, four atoms are hidden within an eight by eight grid. The object of the game is to deduce the exact position of the atoms by examining the paths taken by rays fired into the grid. The object of Gambit is for each player to attempt to be the first to get all of their four men back to the central home area. Players position walls to direct their own men home or to block their opponents and can send a man back to the start by running over him.

Bouncer

Bouncer

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1984

Bouncer is a QBert clone developed and published by Acornsoft for the BBC Microcomputer.

Boxer

Boxer

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1984

Boxer is a platform game written by Wal Mansell. It was released for the BBC Microcomputer by Acornsoft. You and your computer controlled rival are competing for the attentions of a young lady. At the bottom of the screen, she is releasing balloons which you must try to catch when they get stuck in the rafters of the Gym. Any balloons which escape to the top of the screen will be awarded to your opponent. If you collect five balloons before your opponent does, your score will be increased by the bonus in the top right-hand corner of the screen, and you will move to a more challenging Gym. If your opponent is the first one to collect five balloons, you will lose a life and stay in the same Gym. You can only catch balloons safely while they are caught in the rafters. If you try to grab or touch one while it is moving you will fall over. This will also happen if you have contact with your opponent or any of the boxing gloves, hammers or dumb-bells which move across the Gym. Every time you get three falls, you will lose a life. Gloves and hammers can be punched and dumb-bells jumped over to score points. Points can also be scored by jumping up to the punch balls at the bottom of the screen.

Boxer

Boxer

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

Boxer is a platform game written by Wal Mansell. You and your computer controlled rival are competing for the attentions of a young lady. At the bottom of the screen, she is releasing balloons which you must try to catch when they get stuck in the rafters of the Gym. Any balloons which escape to the top of the screen will be awarded to your opponent. If you collect five balloons before your opponent does, your score will be increased by the bonus in the top right-hand corner of the screen, and you will move to a more challenging Gym. If your opponent is the first one to collect five balloons, you will lose a life and stay in the same Gym. You can only catch balloons safely while they are caught in the rafters. If you try to grab or touch one while it is moving you will fall over. This will also happen if you have contact with your opponent or any of the boxing gloves, hammers or dumb-bells which move across the Gym. Every time you get three falls, you will lose a life. Gloves and hammers can be punched and dumb-bells jumped over to score points. Points can also be scored by jumping up to the punch balls at the bottom of the screen. You start the game with three boxers but you will receive a bonus boxer for every 10,000 points you score, up to a maximum of three at any one time.

Breakout (Acornsoft)

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1982

It's a clone of the 1976 arcade classic Breakout from Atari. This version can be found on the Arcade Action compilation from Acornsoft.

Business Games

Business Games

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

Business Games contains two educational games. Although intended for use in business and economic studies, teaching the games are entertaining and thought-provoking in their own right. This guide describes the two programs that make up Business Games. STOKMARK, which simulates the conditions of the stock market, with realistic behaviour of share prices based on an analysis of real companies. In TELEMARK, four teams or players each control the finances of a firm that makes and sells televisions. In both these games each player in turn will be prompted either to select an option (for example, Yes or No) or to enter numbers or letters: the RETURN key should be pressed after each selection or input.

By Fair Means or Foul

By Fair Means or Foul

Acorn Electron - Released - 1988

The objective of the game is to defeat each of the opposing boxers over 15 rounds or within five chances (lives). You can compete against another player or against the computer, and attempt to become the World Champion by defeating six opponents, each in turn more difficult to beat. Once you have become the World Champion, you then continue to defend your title against tough opponents. Apart from foul moves, there are also of course the standard legal moves, including punches and blocks. It will be noticed that a knock-out does not normally indicate the end of a bout, simply the end of a round exhausting all of the boxer's energy. This energy is then restored at the beginning of the next round. If two players become too close, they will automatically go into a hold position and cross sides of the ring. On repetition of this move, a player runs the risk of forfeiting a chance (life).

Carousel

Carousel

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1983

Carousel is a clone of the arcade game Carnival, which is a fixed screen shoot 'em up with an amusement park theme. The game was written by David Shepherd and published by Acornsoft in December 1983. The player controls a gun and has to shoot the targets above him. The player has a limited amount of bullets and when out of them, the game ends. The targets are made up of three different animals: ducks, rabbits and owls as well as letters of the word BONUS. Hitting the letters in the correct order gives a bonus score for each. Ducks are special as they might swoop down towards the player and the player has to shoot them before they land or else he will lose bullets. In addition to the targets, there is also a rotating wheel at the top of the screen, and all of its spokes has to be shot to complete a level. Once everything on the screen has been shot, the player moves on to a bonus round featuring a polar bear. It will move across the screen and the player has to shoot it as many times as possible. For every hit, the bear reverses its direction and increases its speed until it escapes, and the player moves on to the next level.

Castle of Riddles

Castle of Riddles

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1983

Castle of Riddles is a text adventure released by Acornsoft for the BBC Micro (in 1982) and Acorn Electron (1984) home computers. The game was written by Peter Killworth and was one of a series of text adventures written for, or ported to the BBC Micro by the same author (others including Countdown to Doom and Philosopher's Quest). As with all such games, only text is used. The player must use a simple 'verb-noun' format (e.g. 'Go North', 'Get lamp') to control the game. Unlike Killworth's other Acornsoft adventures, Castle of Riddles was not updated and reissued by Topologika so became unavailable after 1985 when Acorn Computers (parent company of Acornsoft) pulled out of the games publishing market. Some of the puzzles however were included in the Topologika version of Philosopher's Quest.

Castle of Riddles

Castle of Riddles

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

"The adventuring trade just isn't what it used to be," you reflect gloomily. "Nobody seems to need a trusty sword or a keen intellect any more." You're down to your last silver piece, and there's tomorrow's dinner yet to be found. Sitting at the inn you contemplate earning an honest living for a change. Perhaps a steady income wouldn't be too boring, after all... Suddenly, a cold draught and the slam of the door distract you from your train of thought, and seconds later, a tall-silver-haired figure in a black cloak slips on to the bench next to you... So begins your magical adventure, with wizardry and hocus pocus of all kinds, booby traps and fiendish riddles to be unravelled along the tortuous route to the Magic Ring of Power. Your reward is to keep the treasure that you find on the way.

Chess

Chess

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

Chess allows you to play a game of chess against either the computer or another player. All the rules of chess are included and the winner is the player that makes the other players King unable to move without being taken. Against the computer you are able to play as white or black and the computer has 10 skill levels (0-9) with zero being the easiest. You are also able to watch the computer play itself. There is also an Editor mode that allows you to set the board up with the pieces in any position you chose and you can attempt to get a mate in two or five moves as well. The program has been designed to support both joysticks, and a printer when available. It was written by Arthur Norman and Nick Pelling.

Chess (Acornsoft)

Chess (Acornsoft)

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1983

Chess allows you to play a game of chess against either the computer or another player. All the rules of chess are included and the winner is the player that makes the other player's King unable to move without being taken. Against the computer you are able to play as white or black and the computer has 10 skill levels (0-9) with zero being the easiest. You are also able to watch the computer play itself. There is also an Editor mode that allows you to set the board up with the pieces in any position you chose and you can attempt to get a mate in two or five moves as well.

Children From Space

Children From Space

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

Codename Droid

Codename Droid

Acorn Electron - Released - 1987

Codename Droid: Stryker's Run - Part 2 is a multi-directional scrolling platform game where only a small part of the whole complex is shown. The joystick is used to control Stryker. In this sequel to Stryker's Run you once again play the role of John Stryker whose mission it is to land on the Planet Volga, navigate the underground complex and find and fly their latest spacecraft codenamed Z11. The complex is split into four zones which are split into a further three sectors. Each sector is full of Volgan soldiers and each must be avoided or killed to get further into the complex. You are armed with a gun and also you have a wrist computer terminal which gives you stats and can recharge your suit and gun when energy cells are collected. There are objects scattered around and can be picked up and used to help you on your way like mines, micro-maps and a jet-pack which needs fuel collecting to keep using it. The most important thing to collect are sets of plutonium rods where four must be collected to fly the ship. Also security passcards are needed to operate the lifts. Mines are exchanged when they are used.

Cosmic Camouflage

Cosmic Camouflage

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1988

This game did not get a standalone release. It was only released on the Play It Again Sam 4 compilation. Prior to this it was known as Space Blaster. The player controls a spaceship and must avoid or destroy asteroids. The ship can rotate, thrust and fire in the same way as the classic Asteroids. This version has different types of asteroids and enemies, and a limited-use camouflage function that lets the player pass through asteroids and enemies.

Countdown to Doom

Countdown to Doom

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

While orbiting the treasure-laden, but inhospitable, planet Doomawangara (Doom for short) your ship suffers a devastating attack from the local air defence system. Grounded on Doom, your ship is both damaged, and threatened with total disintegration due to the corrosive effects of the Doom atmosphere. Repairs to the ship must be made before you can escape, and there's also a tempting array of treasure to be collected; but the clock is ticking away all the while, and it's only a matter of time before the ship will disappear in a cloud of dust, whereupon you must resign yourself to a life in the wilderness of Doom. This ROM Cartridge is designed for use with the Electron Plus 1. As you play the game, you'll find that you will want to SAVE a game at a particular point (for example, before doing something risky, or simply to return to the game at a later time). You will be prompted to find a suitable area on one of your tapes, followed by the usual "RECORD then RETURN" message. This will put the 'dynamic' part of the database onto tape - this is the part which attends to the general house-keeping - where you are, where the objects are etc. The file is automatically called INIT so if you make several SAVEs, you'll need to keep track of which INIT is where. If you wish to restart at one of these positions, load the program as usual, but select S to start from a saved position. You'll be asked to Position the database file. Locate the saved position on tape, set it playing, and press RETURN. Once INIT is loaded (about 45 seconds) the game will start from where you left off. Should you QUIT or die, you'll be asked if you want another game. "Y" or "y" will return you to the start of the game; "N" or "n" will simply end it.

Countdown to Doom

Countdown to Doom

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1982

Countdown to Doom is a text adventure computer game written in 1982 by Professor Peter Killworth. There are two sequels, Return to Doom and Last Days of Doom. The game was first published by Acornsoft for the BBC Micro in 1982. It was ported to the Acorn Electron in 1984 but only released as a ROM cartridge for the Plus 1 expansion. This was the only game released exclusively as a ROM cart for the Electron. The game was later re-released in 1987 by Topologika (who also published the game's sequels). This version was expanded by about 50% and as well as being released for the BBC and Electron (on disk only), the game was ported to many other systems including ZX Spectrum (+3 disk only), PC, Amstrad CPC, Amstrad PCW, Atari ST and RM Nimbus. It was also available for Acorn RISC OS computers as a compilation with Return to Doom and Philosopher's Quest. In this game, the player's spaceship crash-lands on Doom's inhospitable surface and they emerge from the wreckage to realise that, unless they can locate the necessary spare parts, their ship will corrode away in a mere 400 time units. There are many ways to be killed in this game.

Cranky

Cranky

Acorn Electron - Released

Crazee Rider

Crazee Rider

Acorn Electron - Released - 1987

A behind-the-bike rally driving game with a variety of tracks and which allows you to knock other riders off their bikes.

Crazy Tracer

Crazy Tracer

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

You are in charge of a paint roller which you must guide around the edges of a maze of rectangles. Trying to prevent you from repairing these lines are several monsters which attempt to catch and crush the roller as it moves along. There are two different kinds of screen to paint: one which offers you the chance of gaining bonus points by painting in rectangles containing different objects, the other which poses the problem of how to avoid running out of paint. Crazy Tracer is fully compatible with either keyboard or joysticks.

Crazy Tracer

Crazy Tracer

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1984

Crazy Tracer is a clone of Amidar. The player controls a paint brush and needs to paint levels divided into rectangles of various sizes. They are painted by moving over the bordering edges, colouring them. When a rectangle is traced entirely, it is filled with a colour. Meanwhile enemies that roam the edges need to be avoided. Sometimes fruit appears in the middle of a rectangle for a short moment. When the rectangle is painted while the fruit is still inside, additional points are earned. The character has a number of lives and the game keeps tracks of the score.

Crime & Detection Quiz

Crime & Detection Quiz

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

How does your knowledge of Crime fiction rate against a Grandmaster of the genre? This rewarding and compelling program for your BBC Model B or Acorn Electron computer has been specially adapted from the Weidenfield Quiz book and will provide many hours of edification and amusement for family and friends. Here are Sherlock Holmes, Lord Peter Wimsey and Philip Marlowe, together with James Bond and George Smiley. This fascinating quiz includes questions on crime techniques, television cops, the history of detection and writers such as Raymond Chandler and Agatha Christie. Crime and detection is one of a series of six Grandmaster Quizzes, in which you can pit your knowledge against a grandmaster of the subject. The writer's specialised skill and expert knowledge makes the quiz both challenging and exciting. Each program has thirty sections of ten questions - a massive 300 questions in all - and you can take the quiz alone, in competition with a friend, or in teams. You can choose a timed option too - and if you're getting too many of the answers right, your computer can reduce the time you have to answer! Julian Symons is the author of twenty-one crime novels. He is President of the Detection Club and has written the definitive history of the genre, "Bloody Murder".

Cube Master

Cube Master

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1982

A computerized version of the Rubik's Cube for the BBC Micro. It was developed by Robert MacMillan and published by Acornsoft in 1982.

Cyborg Warriors

Cyborg Warriors

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1991

Cyborg Warriors did not get a standalone release. It was only released on the Play It Again Sam 15 compilation. It is a classic 2D side-scrolling shoot 'em up where you control a cyborg and fly through a variety of levels swarmed by alien enemies. Your main goal is to shoot everything that moves towards you and you must at all costs avoid any physical contact with them. Apart from the flying enemy forces there are some ground-to-air missile pods around. You must collect tokens that will give you more powerful weapons. Additionally, the game offers a two-players mode!

Defender

Defender

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1982

This is Acornsoft's version of the original Defender game. It had a very short life having to be withdrawn due to copyright issues and was later re-released with the title Planetoid.

Draughts & Reversi

Draughts & Reversi

Acorn Electron - Released - October 1, 1983

Draughts : The traditional game has been faithfully reproduced on screen for you to try your hand at playing the computer. Pieces are promoted to Kings on reaching the opponent's end of the board, and the computer will make sure you follow the rules, insisting that you make all possible jumps or suffer the consequences - the computer has the option of 'huffing' the offending piece. Reversi : In this board game you play the computer, the aim of the game being to capture as many of your opponent's pieces as possible. (Reversi is also known as Othello.) This game is fully compatible with either keyboard or joysticks.

Draughts and Reversi

Draughts and Reversi

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1983

In Draughts the player plays against the computer. Pieces are promoted to Kings on reaching the opponent's end of the board, and the computer will make sure you follow the rules, insisting that you make all possible jumps or suffer the consequences - the computer has the option of 'huffing' the offending piece. In Reversi each player tries to capture their opponent's pieces, the objective being to gain as many pieces as possible by the end of the game. (Reversi is also known as Othello.) In both games you play against the computer. Both programs take advantage of all available memory, and so on the Model A the board is displayed in Teletext Mode, and on the Model B it is displayed in screen Mode 1.

Drogna

Drogna

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1983

Drogna was originally a floor-tile puzzle game which featured on the UK television game show The Adventure Game. The game became so popular that Acornsoft released a version for the BBC Micro home computer. The board displayed on the screen contains rows of 'Drogna' in five different shapes and colours. At the top and bottom of the board are the players' home bases and at each side are the vaults, each of which contains three diamonds. The game always starts with the red player having a half-turn. After that, each player has a full turn, and the current player is indicated by his man moving his head from side to side on the screen. The aim of the game is for each player to score points by collecting diamonds from the two vaults and depositing them in his own home base. Once a diamond has been removed from a vault it cannot be replaced and it retains its value until the end of the game. A diamond can be classed as being in one of three different states - either swag, loot or dump. While a diamond is still in a vault or on a drogna it is referred to as loot and can be picked up by either player. After it has been picked up and is being carried around, it is referred to as swag and the player holding it has the value of it displayed in the box at his home base labelled swag. If a player manages to deposit a diamond at his home base the diamond is referred to as dump and again its value is displayed at his home base, this time in the box labelled dump. The player who owns a dump does not gain the score for it until another swag is dropped on top of it. Until this happens the dump can be stolen by his opponent, although the player who placed the dump in his home base is not allowed to remove it again from there. The game ends when one of the players manages to score 900 points.

Elite

Elite

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - September 20, 1984

Elite is a space trading video game, written and developed by David Braben and Ian Bell and originally published by Acornsoft for the BBC Micro and Acorn Electron computers in September 1984. In the game the player can fly around the universe in his or her space ship. The player starts out with virtually no equipment and can trade goods between star systems to make a living. More money allows the player to buy better equipment. Meanwhile the player must be on the lookout for pirates. The tape versions of Elite were part of the original release, alongside the first BBC disk release. They differ from the disk version in that they don't feature missions and have less types of ships. There are two of these tape releases, for the Acorn Electron and the BBC Micro Model B. The Acorn Electron release also doesn't feature the alien Thargoids race or suns, and displays the entire game in video mode 4 (black and white), so no colour HUD is present.

Elite

Elite

Acorn Electron - Released - September 20, 1984

Elite is a space trading video game, written and developed by David Braben and Ian Bell and originally published by Acornsoft for the BBC Micro and Acorn Electron computers in September 1984.Elite's open-ended game model, and revolutionary 3D graphics led to it being ported to virtually every contemporary home computer system, and earned it a place as a classic and a genre maker in gaming history. The game's title derives from one of the player's goals of raising their combat rating to the exalted heights of "Elite". Elite was one of the first home computer games to use wire-frame 3D graphics with hidden line removal. It added graphics and twitch gameplay aspects to the genre established by the 1974 game Star Trader. Another novelty was the inclusion of The Dark Wheel, a novella by Robert Holdstock which gave players insight into the moral and legal codes to which they might aspire.

Elite

Elite

Acorn Archimedes - Released - 1991

Elite is a free-form space trading and combat simulation, commonly considered the progenitor of this sub-genre. The player initially controls a character referred to as "Commander Jameson", starting at Lave Station with 100 credits and a lightly armed trading ship called Cobra Mark III. Most of the game consists of traveling to various star systems, trading with their inhabitants, gaining money and reputation. Money can also be gained by other means beside trading; these include undertaking military missions, bounty hunting, asteroid mining, and even piracy. As the player character earns money, he becomes able to upgrade his ships with enhancements such as better weapons, shields, increased cargo capacity, an automated docking system, etc. The game utilizes pseudo-3D wire-frame graphics; its world is viewed from a first-person perspective. It has no overarching story, though a race known as Thargoids play the role of antagonists: their ships will often attack the player-controlled ship, forcing the player to engage in space combat. Combat is action-oriented, taking place in the same environment as the exploration. The player must use various weapons the ship is equipped with, as well as manoeuvre the ship, trying to dodge enemy attacks. The player can also choose to attack neutral ships; doing so will decrease the protagonist's reputation, eventually attracting the attention of the galactic police. Elite is notable for its expansive game world, consisting of eight galaxies and 256 planets. The player is free to travel to any of these planets, provided his ship has enough fuel for the trip (the ship's fuel capacity is limited for a journey to the distance of seven light years). The Acorn Archimedes version, ArcElite (1991), written by Warren Burch & Clive Gringras and regarded by Stuff magazine as the best conversion of the original game, added intelligent opponents who engage in their own private battles and police who take an active interest in protecting the law. As well as such gameplay enhancements, the version also exploited the more modern hardware by using polygon mesh graphics in place of the wire-frames. The game world no longer seems to be centered around the player; freighter fleets with escorts go about their own business, pirate formations patrol lawless systems looking for cargo to loot and mining ships can often be found breaking up asteroids for their mineral content. Unlike the mythical Generation Ships of the original, rare occurrences of other non-pirate entities mentioned in the manual really can be found in the Archimedes version: geometric formations of space beacons; hermits living among the asteroids; abandoned ships towed by police (although Dredgers and Generation Ships are confirmed not to exist in Archimedes Elite). The Archimedes version of Elite was originally written to be a space trading game called Trojan - however the obvious similarities eventually meant that to avoid a potential lawsuit Trojan had to become an official Elite conversion.

English

English

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

Facemaker

Facemaker

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

Finest Favourites

Finest Favourites

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

Firebug

Firebug

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

As fireman on duty, you have been called out to a warehouse where a firebug is reported to be attempting to burn it down. Your main concern is to rescue the drums of highly inflammable petrol and take them to the safety of a water tank. You can jump over the fires or put them out with a fire extinguisher, but be careful to avoid the clouds of dense white smoke. Complete with sound effects, full colour graphics and a table of high scores, Firebug is fully compatible with either keyboard or joysticks.

Firebug

Firebug

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1984

Firebug is a platform game written by Wal Mansell. It was published by Acornsoft for the BBC Microcomputer in 1984. It was also released for the Acorn Electron.

Free Fall

Free Fall

Acorn Electron - Released - 1985

When the Alphoid battleship attacked Deep Space Station Coriolis and Alphoid life forms injected the air supplies with their own cyanide-based atmosphere, only one crew member managed to don his space suit in time. Unable to reach the armoury, he must face the Alphoid warriors barehanded to defend not only his own life but also the vital computer records which the Space Station contains. In this game you control the crewman, manoeuvring him around the Space Station as he tries to destroy Alphoids before being destroyed himself - either by the enemy or due to lack of oxygen. Acornsoft Free Fall is compatible with either keyboard or joysticks.

Free Fall

Free Fall

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1983

In this game, you control the crewman, manoeuvring him around the Space Station as he tries to destroy Alphoids before being destroyed himself - either by the enemy or due to lack of oxygen. The Space Station is displayed as a large octagon. Although the station is rotating, it is held fixed on the screen, which means that the objects within move in curves rather than straight lines. On the left of the screen the rotation rate of the station is displayed and a monitor displays a trace of the crewman's heartbeat, recorded from his suit's biomonitors. On the right of the screen, his remaining air supply is displayed. Acornsoft Free Fall is fully compatible with either keyboard or joysticks and includes a table of high scores.

Games of Strategy

Games of Strategy

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1982

Games of Strategy is a compilation of four games. It contains: * Galaxy * Gomoku * Masterbrain * Reversi The four games are not available separately and only as part of this compilation.

Games Pack 1

Games Pack 1

Acorn Atom - Released - 1981

Acornsoft Games Pack 1 is a collection of three games. - Asteroids is a version of the arcade game and plays as can be expected with the player in control of a space ship that moves forward with thrust and can rotate to aim and shoot at the asteroids that move around the screen. There are four asteroids on the screen and when shot they split into smaller ones. The larger ones are worth one point and the small ones two. - Sub Hunt is a text based simulation game where the player is in command of a destroyer and has to destroy a submarine. For every turn the player is given the distance to the submarine and can decide the speed and course of the destroyer. The submarine is automatically destroyed when the destroyer gets within one mile's distance of it. - Breakout is a version of Atari's game with the same name. It works the same with the player controlling a paddle that is used to hit bricks with a ball. For each brick the player earns points depending on how far off they are. Hitting the upper half will lead to increased speed and sending the ball through the wall will lead to the paddle shrinking. When all bricks are gone another set will appear. The player has three balls and game is over when they have all been lost.

Games Pack 10

Games Pack 10

Acorn Atom - Released - 1981

Acornsoft Games Pack 10 is a collection of ten games. Breakout is variant of the arcade game with the same name where a bat is used to destroy bricks with a ball. Hectic is a variant of the arcade game Avalanche where the player has to catch falling bricks so that they do not build up to the height of the paddle. Mastermind is an adaptation of the board game with the same name where the player gets ten attempts to figure out a four digit code. Ski is a skiing game where the player has to ski down a mountain and reach home safely without hitting any trees. Snake is a variant of a snake game where the player has to eat food that causes the snake to grow while avoiding colliding with walls or body. Track is a racing game where the player has to drive a car along a vertically scrolling race track without hitting any obstacles. Simon is an adaptation of the electronic game with the same name where the player sees letters flashing and then has to enter the correct sequence. Squash is a Pong-like game based on the sport where the player has to hit the walls as many times as possible before missing fifteen times. Moon is a variant of Lunar Lander where thrust controls are used to land a lunar module safely in the bottom of a crater. Bombs-Away is a variant of an artillery game where two players take turns shooting projectiles over a mountain in an attempt to hit the opponent.

Games Pack 11

Games Pack 11

Acorn Atom - Released - 1981

Comprises: Dominoes (Acornsoft), Missile Base (Acornsoft) and Snooker (Acornsoft)

Games Pack 2

Games Pack 2

Acorn Atom - Released - 1981

Acornsoft Games Pack 2 is a collection of three games. - Dogfight is a flight combat game similar to the arcade game Biplane and the console game Spitfire. The game is for two players only with no AI option available. The aim for each player is to simply shoot down the opponent without crashing into the ground or the top of the screen. The first player to reach a score of 100 wins the game. - Mastermind is an adaptation of the board game with the same name or the pencil game Bulls and Cows. It's played against an AI opponent whose four digit code the player has to guess on. For each guess the player gets to know the number of bulls (correct digits in the right position) and the number of cows (correct digits in the wrong position). At the same time the AI guesses on player's code who enters the numbers of bulls and cows manually. - Zombie is a variant of Chase (or Robots). The player is a survivor of a plane crash who finds himself surrounded by zombies. There are also swamps and the aim of the game is to lure the zombies into the swamps. The game is turn based and the player can move one square at a time in any direction and the zombies will do the same. The player dies when caught by a zombie and wins when all zombies have moved into the swamps.

Games Pack 3

Games Pack 3

Acorn Atom - Released - 1984

Comprises: Black Box (Acornsoft), Lunar Lander (Acornsoft) and Rat Trap (Acornsoft)

Games Pack 4

Games Pack 4

Acorn Atom - Released - 1981

Comprises: Four Row (Acornsoft), Space Attack (Acornsoft) and Star Trek (Acornsoft)

Games Pack 6

Games Pack 6

Acorn Atom - Released

Acornsoft Games Pack 6 contains the following three games: 1. Dodgems 2. Simon 3. Amoeba

Games Pack 7

Games Pack 7

Acorn Atom - Released - 1981

Acornsoft Games Pack 7 contains the following three games: Ballistics (Acornsoft), Green Things (Acornsoft) and Snake (Acornsoft)

Games Pack 8

Games Pack 8

Acorn Atom - Released - 1981

Comprises: Gomoku (Acornsoft), Robots (Acornsoft) and Stargate (Acornsoft)

Gateway to Karos

Gateway to Karos

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1983

As a local historian, you had been allowed into the great library of Karoway Manor. There between the pages of an ancient book you found a seemingly much older sheet of paper. it told of a stone gateway to the mythical land of karos opening only at midnight on the summer solstice. Were it not for the majestic stone arch in the centre of the manor lawn, and that it was by then dusk on MidSummer's Day, you might have replaced the page without a thought... This is a vast and fascinating adventure with the accent firmly on intrigue and ingenuity. There is more than one route to many of the treasures on the island of Karos but whichever path you choose you will be beset by treacchery. even the recovery of the Talisman of Khoronz- of which you will learn on you travels- will be no guarantee of a safe return nor proof against the wish that you had remained a historian in some quiet manor library.

Go

Go

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

Go is a computerised development of an original game played with stones on a 13 by 13 grid, based upon occupying territory and capturing enemy stones. It is a powerful program for either one or two players, plus an option where the computer plays against itself. The program will only accept legal moves so beginners can experiment and let the program teach t hem how to play. Players start with a blank grid and take it in turns to place markers at the points where the grid lines intersect; the main aim is to occupy as much territory as possible and then to capture enemy markers, or groups, by surrounding them. Markers of the same colour joined together along the lines of the grid are a group and can be captured when an opposing marker is placed on the group's last liberty point. Liberties are the adjacent intersections to a single or group of markers. Markers cannot be joined across diagonals to form groups.

Go

Go

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1984

Go is a computerised development of an original game played with stones on a 13 by 13 grid, based upon occupying territory and capturing enemy stones. It is a powerful program for either one or two players, plus an option where the computer plays against itself. The program will only accept legal moves so beginners can experiment and let the program teach them how to play. Players start with a blank grid and take it in turns to place markers at the points where the grid lines intersect; the main aim is to occupy as much territory as possible and then to capture enemy markers, or groups, by surrounding them. Markers of the same colour joined together along the lines of the grid are a group and can be captured when an opposing marker is placed on the group's last liberty point. Liberties are the adjacent intersections to a single or group of markers. Markers cannot be joined across diagonals to form groups.

Grand Prix Construction Set

Grand Prix Construction Set

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1987

Grand Prix Construction Set is a motor-racing game with a difference: it allows you to design your own race circuits - using straights, fast bends, sharp bends, chicanes and hump back bridges. Or you can select one of the many pre-defined race tracks, which include most of the world's famous Grand Prix venues. Then race against another player, or against the computer - there are five skill levels to choose from.

Hellforce

BBC Microcomputer System - Unreleased - 1983

An unreleased game from Acornsoft. Protect the shield from incoming aliens by shooting them!

Hide & Seek

Hide & Seek

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

History Quiz

History Quiz

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

How does your knowledge of History rate against a Grandmaster of the genre? This rewarding and compelling program for your BBC model B or Acorn Electron computer has been specially adapted from the Weidenfield Quiz book and will provide hours of edification and amusement for family and friends. Do you know what was extraordinary about the execution of Anne Boleyn? Or whose horse was awarded campaign medals by special command of Queen Victoria? If you can answer these questions, you are likely to do pretty well with the other 298 included in this quiz. It covers all aspects of British history, from Julius Caesar to Margaret Thatcher: kings and queens, riots and rebellions, mysteries and murders.

Hopper

Hopper

Acorn Electron - Released - August 1, 1984

Hopper for the Acorn Electron Hop the frog across the busy motorway trying to avoid four lanes of fast-moving traffic. To get across the river to the frog's lair you must leap on to the logs and turtles' backs, but beware of the diving turtles, the crocodile and the snake. Complete with music and full sound effects, dragonfly, timer and table of high scores. Acornsoft Hopper is fully compatible with either keyboard or joysticks.

Hopper

Hopper

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1983

for the BBC Microcomputer Model B Hop the frog across the busy motorway trying to avoid four lanes of fast-moving traffic. To get across the river to the frog's lair you must leap on to the logs and turtles' backs, but beware of the diving turtles, the crocodile and the snake. Complete with music and full sound effects, dragonfly, timer and table of high scores. Acornsoft Hopper is fully compatible with either keyboard or joysticks.

How To Write Adventure Games

How To Write Adventure Games

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

The programs on this cassette are designed to be used in conjunction with the book How To Write Adventure Games for the BBC Microcomputer Model B and Acorn Electron by Peter Killworth.

I Do

I Do

Acorn Electron - Released - May 1, 1984

This program is based upon a series of fascinating questionnaires used by Hans Eysenck in his book '...I Do' Your Guide to a Happy Marriage published by Century Books in 1983. The program can provide couples (married or unmarried) with a great deal of useful information about themselves and their relationship. Used honestly "I Do The Program" can help you understand just what psychologists mean by the terms introversion versus extraversion, emotional stability versus instability, high libido versus low libido; and give you a fairly clear idea of how you compare with your partner in these areas of personality and indicate what this could mean for your relationship. I Do The Program" will provide information on the following: PERSONALITY MARITAL SATISFACTION SOCIAL ATTITUDES FEMINISM AND ANTI-FEMINISM MASCULINITY/FEMININITY SEXUAL ATTITUDES Warning : The Author and Publishers accept no responsibility whatsoever for the success or failure of any existing or future relationship examined by this program.

Introductory Cassette

Introductory Cassette

Acorn Electron - Released - 1982

The cassette which came with the Electron computer. It contains a collection of 15 utility, demo and game programs.

Introductory Package 4: Games

Introductory Package 4: Games

Acorn Atom - Released - 1982

JCB Digger

JCB Digger

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1983

JCB Digger was programmed by Jonathon Griffiths and released by Acornsoft. This was a new type of game for AcornSoft - a sideways scroller. The object of the game was to capture the 'meanies' in holes and then fill them in to put the 'meanies' to sleep. In reality, the game was jerky, flickery and a fiddle to play. But it did introduce a continuous scrolling level which was put to good effect by future games such as the Repton trilogy, Ravenskull and others.

Juggle Puzzle

Juggle Puzzle

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

Kingdom of Hamil

Kingdom of Hamil

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1983

A huge adventure game in a medieval setting with some ingenious puzzles and mazes. The game is a slightly trimmed version of the one written by Jonathan Partington on the Phoenix mainframe. It was converted by Peter Kilworth for the BBC Micro. It was first published by Acornsoft for the BBC Micro and later re-released by Topologika for a number of platforms including the BBC Micro and Electron.

Labyrinth (Acornsoft)

Labyrinth (Acornsoft)

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1984

Labyrinth is a video game developed by Michael Mathison and published in 1984 by Acornsoft for the BBC Micro. At the time, it was a highly acclaimed Acornsoft release, with its high resolution graphics, addictive gameplay and fluid animation. In 1987 the game was reissued on Superior Software's Acornsoft Hits compilation. Labyrinth is a scrolling 2D shoot 'em up, consisting of a complex labyrinth made up of multiple levels. Each level is made up of a number of rooms, with the player only able to see a single room at any one time. Doorways are provided allowing the player to move between rooms. Each level contains two special rooms, the 'Gate Room', and the 'Key Room'. The Gate Room contains an impenetrable gate, beyond which lies the next level. The Key Room contains a jewel which will open the gate, and is generally the most well-guarded and dangerous room in the level. Rooms are populated with a variety of monsters, which become more and more dangerous as the player progresses through the game. The player is able to shoot or avoid the various monsters, as well as squash them with a "boulder" that the player is able to push around with them as they travel. Colliding with a monster will cause the player to lose health, often leading to the player's death. Different types of fruit are scattered throughout the labyrinth, which will increase the player's health when eaten. The player slowly, but consistently, loses health at all times while in the Labyrinth, and will eventually die without eating fruit.

Let's Count

Let's Count

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

Life

Life

Acorn Atom - Released

Magic Mushrooms

Magic Mushrooms

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1985

Magic Mushrooms is a platform game released by Acornsoft for the BBC Microcomputer and Acorn Electron. You have to go around the levels, collecting the mushrooms and avoiding the monsters. To obstruct you there are one-way ladders, conveyor belts, trampolines and more, and you really have to think about the path you are taking. The graphics are low-res, but very crisp and clear, making them look much better. The game also has a screen designer built in, so that you can create your own levels.

Magic Mushrooms

Magic Mushrooms

Acorn Electron - Released - September 1, 1985

Magic Mushrooms isn't only an exciting game of skill and quick thinking - it's also a complete game constructor allowing unlimited scope for ingenuity in designing games for you and your friends to play. Guide Murphy around the screen leaping from brick to brick, bouncing on trampolines, sliding down slides and gliding up escalators in his quest for mushrooms. He'll find them all over the place. Even on slippery ice sheets and treacherous ground which wobbles beneath his feet, or disappears as he steps off it. Collecting mushrooms is a hazardous occupation; Murphy must watch out for marauding monsters as he races against time towards the chequered flag. The game includes nine screens, ranging in difficulty from easy to extremely hard and showing just a small selection of the many techniques you can use in designing your own screens.

Master Break

Master Break

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1991

Master Break is a snooker themed quiz game that can be played by up to four players. In a single player game the aim is to get the highest break (up to a maximum of 147) while the multi player game is simply about getting the highest score. The player starts with a red ball question and the player has to answer by choosing one of three alternatives before time runs out. After that the player can choose between balls of different colours with different subjects. There are six categories of questions: Science and Nature, Pop Music, Geography, Sports and Pastimes, Art and History. Each player can pass up to three red questions. In a multi player game an "over pocket" sign might appear and answering wrong will then lead to a foul shot. Foul shots lead to the opponents being awarded points.

Mathematics 1

Mathematics 1

Acorn Electron - Released - 1985

Mathematics 2

Mathematics 2

Acorn Electron - Released - 1985

Maze

Maze

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1984

Maze is a real-time game with fast 3D graphics. You must find your way around the mazes which make up the security system inside the top secret installation of a rival company. To obtain the secret information you are looking for, you must search as many of the levels as you can, moving between them in the computer-controlled lift. The corridors are patrolled by robot guards armed with rechargeable guns who will shoot you on sight if you can't avoid or destroy them.

Maze

Maze

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

You have entered the top-secret installation of a rival company with the aim of stealing secret information. Inside the building is a multi-level security system, each level consisting of a maze of corridors patrolled by robot guards who will shoot you on sight. The robots are armed with guns which they can recharge by running over special power points which are marked by pentangles on the floor of the maze. Your company's scientists have been able to duplicate the design of these guns so that you too are able to replenish your ammunition by running over the power points. You have a maximum of three bullets at any one time. The only exit from each level is a computer-controlled lift, programmed to open its doors only when triggered by an electronic security key; a separate key is needed at each level. This key can be found in an indestructible iridium box somewhere in the maze. The box can only be opened when three coloured idenity tags have been dropped into it. These three tags; red, blue and green, are randomly positioned in the maze. When you have collected all three, take them to the box and drop them. The box will open automatically and you can take the key. To help you find your way about, you have an advanced electronic compass. This will remember the layout of all the corridors as you explore them and can automatically detect the positions of the guards. The compass will also remember the positions of power points and the box containing the key once you have found them. The compass can display a plan view of the maze at any time showing all the features you have so far encountered. When you have the key, take it to the lift which will open as you approach and carry you to the next level. Higher levels are protected by more guards and have fewer power points.

Me And My Micro

Me And My Micro

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

Comprises: Anagrams (Acornsoft), Bomber (Acornsoft), Kongo (Acornsoft), Matchem (Acornsoft), Mazerace (Acornsoft), Monsterzap (Acornsoft), Pairs (Acornsoft) and Twister (Acornsoft)

Meteor Mission

Meteor Mission

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1984

Meteor Mission is a Lunar Rescue variant. The player controls an emergency space capsule which has be to be used to rescue six astronauts stranded on an alien planet. The player starts in a mothership at the top of the screen from which he has to descend down to the surface where the astronauts are waiting. But to succeed he has to navigate his way through a field of meteors and land on one of two platforms at the surface. The player can control the capsule left and right and use thrust to slow down the speed. In addition to the meteors there is also an alien pursuit ship that launches missiles at the player. Once an astronaut has entered the capsule it's time to go back up. Unlike the original arcade game it's the same field of meteors that the player has to move through. The player can now use a gun to shoot at the meteors. When all six astronauts have been rescued the player gets a bonus and moves on to the next level.

Meteors

Meteors

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1982

Meteors is an Action game, developed and published by Acornsoft, which was released in Europe in 1982. Another almost perfect arcade conversion, this one is of Atari's Asteroids. The gameplay was just like the arcade game, and the visuals had been enhanced from the original Black and White graphics

Meteors

Meteors

Acorn Electron - Released - 1983

"Steer your laser-ship through a hall of meteors smashing them with your laser bolts as they hurtle towards you on all sides. Avoid being hit by the missiles from hostile flying saucers which fire at you as they pass. Your ship is equipped with as many laser bolts as you can fire and as a last resort, you can escape through hyperspace. Complete with sound effects and table of high scores." Steer the ship to avoid the meteors, firing at them as you go. Large meteors will split into smaller ones when they are hit, and these will in turn break into four fragments. Watch out for hostile flying saucers which fire at you as they pass. When the going gets too rough you try try escaping through hyperspace but you can't be sure where you will re-materialise and so this can be risky! Clear all the meteors before going on to the next screen. You start off with three ships but can gain an extra one every time you score 10000 points.

Missile Base

Missile Base

Acorn Atom - Released - 1981

Missile Base was released for the Acorn Atom as part of the Acornsoft Games Pack 11 which also included the games Dominoes and Snooker. In Missile Base you must defend your cities from enemy attack with intercept missiles launched from the three ground bases.

Missile Base

Missile Base

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1982

Missile Base is a variant of the arcade game Missile Command. The game works the same with the player being in command of protecting six cities from an assault of missiles. The player has access to three anti missile bases that each contains nine rockets which when fired explodes into fireballs that destroy any missiles within its radius. When playing with keyboard each base is controlled individually while when using joystick the base nearest to the crosshair is used. In addition to the regular missiles there are missiles with multiple war heads and intelligent missiles which avoid the fireballs. There are also enemy satellites and planes that fly across the screen and fire at the cities.

Missiles

Missiles

Acorn Atom - Released - 1981

You must defend your cities from the falling missiles and the aircraft. You have 3 missile bases each containing 15 missiles.

Monsters

Monsters

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

Pursued by monsters along walls and up and down ladders, your only hope of survival is to trap them in holes which you dig in their path. If a monster falls in, the hole must be filled in completely or the monster will crawl out. Monsters can be killed in one of two ways: either by falling through holes which you dig and fill, or by being hit by monsters from above. If a monster is hit by a falling monster, both die. If you manage to kill all the monsters, you graduate to another screen. The longer you survive, the more you can score as the monsters vary and become more devious. Whereas red monsters only need to fall through one level, green monsters must fall through two levels and white monsters must fall through three levels before they actually die. If they fall through more than the minimum number of levels, then your score will be even higher. From the second screen onwards, any red or green monster that is allowed to crawl out of a hole, mutates into a green or white monster respectively.

Monsters

Monsters

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1982

Monsters is a variant of the arcade game Space Panic. It's a single screen platform game where the player has to kill monsters by digging holes in the ground. When the monsters then walk over the holes they get trapped and the player can kill them by filling in the hole. They will then fall down and die and any other monsters they hit will also be killed. If the hole is not completely filled in the monster will crawl out and escape. There are three different monsters and the differ in the number of levels they have to fall through to die. Red ones need to fall through one level only, green ones two and white ones three. After the first stage red and green monsters that escape from a hole will mutate into green or white monsters respectively. The player also has a depleting oxygen level and a stage has to be completed before it reaches zero.

Music Quiz

Music Quiz

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

How does your knowledge of Music rate against a Grandmaster of the genre? This rewarding and compelling program for your BBC model B or Acorn Electron computer has been specially adapted from the Weidenfield Quiz book and will provide hours of edification and amusement for family and friends. Do you know who said 'My music is best understood by children and animals?' Or which love song mentions Woolworths? This amusing and fascinating quiz will challenge any music lover, whether your tastes are for Bach, Bizet, Beiderbecke or the Bee Gees. Music is one of a series of six Grandmaster Quizzes, in which you can pit your knowledge against a grandmaster of the subject. The writer's specialised skill and expert knowledge makes the quiz both challenging and exciting. Each program has thirty sections of ten questions - a massive 300 questions in all - and you can take the quiz alone, in competition with a friend, or in teams. You can choose a timed option too - and if you're getting too many of the answers right, your computer can reduce the time you have to answer! This pack contains one program cassette, one quiz data cassette and an instruction booklet. Steve Race, well-known British broadcaster, writer and musician, is the question-master and compiler of the popular television and radio quiz series 'My Music'. He is the author of 'Musician at Large: An Autobiography', 'Dear Music Lover' and 'My Music'." 'Questioning is not the mode of conversation among gentlemen,'

Number Chaser

Number Chaser

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

Number Gulper

Number Gulper

Acorn Electron - Released - 1984

Number Puzzler

Number Puzzler

Acorn Electron

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