Hewson Consultants

3D Lunattack

3D Lunattack

Sinclair ZX Spectrum - Released - 1984

The war on the Seiddab rages on, and you now take part in an attack on their moon base. You fly a hovercraft a bit above the moon's surface, and must shoot down the enemy's DAB tanks. After that ring of defense is penetrated, you must dodge your way through a space minefield above a mountain range, and then a missile firing range before reach the Seiddab's command base.

3D Lunattack

3D Lunattack

Dragon 32/64 - Released - 1984

The war on the Seiddab rages on, and you now take part in an attack on their moon base. You fly a hovercraft a bit above the moon's surface, and must shoot down the enemy's DAB tanks. After that ring of defense is penetrated, you must dodge your way through a space minefield above a mountain range, and then a missile firing range before reach the Seiddab's command base. Unlike the prequel 3D Seiddab Attack, you are now flying, and can make more adventurous maneuvers.

3D Seiddab Attack

3D Seiddab Attack

Sinclair ZX Spectrum - Released - 1984

The Seiddab Trilogy is a series of video games designed by Steve Turner (as Graftgold) for the ZX Spectrum and published by Hewson Consultants. It consists of 3D Space-Wars (1983), 3D Seiddab Attack (1984) and 3D Lunattack. All three games were later published together as "The Seiddab Trilogy" by Hewson for the Rotronics Wafadrive. The series name is derived from the word "baddies" being spelt in reverse.

3D Seiddab Attack

3D Seiddab Attack

Dragon 32/64 - Released - 1984

The Seiddab Trilogy is a series of video games designed by Steve Turner (as Graftgold) for the ZX Spectrum and published by Hewson Consultants. It consists of 3D Space-Wars (1983),[1] 3D Seiddab Attack (1984)[2] and 3D Lunattack.[3] All three games were later published together as "The Seiddab Trilogy" by Hewson for the Rotronics Wafadrive.[4] The series name is derived from the word "baddies" being spelt in reverse. Astroclone (1985), also programmed by Turner and featuring the Seiddab, is part of this series.[5]

3D Space-Wars

3D Space-Wars

Dragon 32/64 - Released - 1984

The first game to star the evil Seiddab, 3D Space Wars gives exactly what the title promises. As soon as you warp into outer space, your cockpit screen is filled with alien spaceships which must be shot down, for you are mankind's last hope, armed with the Earth's only remaining battle spaceship. Gameplay is arcade-oriented, with few cockpit gauges and displays to keep in mind. The three cockpit instruments are your radar, speed readout and fuel meter. You run out of fuel when you fire your phasors and when you are hit by enemy fire. You can replenish your fuel by docking with the fuel...

Anarchy

Anarchy

Amstrad CPC - Released - 1988

Inside an Ace Mk2 Interceptor tank, you have been assigned a hazardous 16-stage mission. You must travel to the overrun planet of Sentinel 4, and destroy the weapons caches the rebels have build up. They can't be blasted when you are right next to them, ensuring that a degree of planning and strategy is required. Viewed from above in levels with simple sideways scrolling, the objective on each level is to shoot each of the weapons crates, before going through the newly-opened exit. Guard droids must be avoided, but shooting them can leave them inactive for a short period of time, and they...

Astaroth: The Angel of Death

Astaroth: The Angel of Death

Atari ST - 1989

The game is a platformer where you must guide your characters through the catacombs of Astaroth's domain. To aid you in your quest you can pick up nine different mind powers like shape shifting and levitation. You will have to defeat Astaroth's three guardians of the soul along the way, firstly a sphinx, a 3 headed hydra and finally a marlith demon. Once you have defeated the guardians you will have to face Astaroth herself in a battle of the minds.

Cybernoid: The Fighting Machine

Cybernoid: The Fighting Machine

Sinclair ZX Spectrum - Released - 1987

Cybernoid: The Fighting Machine is a shoot 'em up developed and published in 1987 by Hewson Consultants for the ZX Spectrum, and was then ported to the Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, NES, and Amiga. It was programmed by Raffaele Cecco. The Sinclair ZX Spectrum and Atari ST versions featured a main theme by Dave Rogers, while the Commodore C64 version (later released on the Wii's Virtual Console service) featured a completely different theme by Jeroen Tel.

Eliminator

Eliminator

Atari ST - Released - 1988

A shoot ‘em up set on a patchwork-quilt coloured road, Eliminator puts you in control of a ship with a basic weapon, flying along at breakneck speed. There are barriers along the way to avoid, often set in quick succession, and lots of bad guys to shoot at or avoid - their shots must be avoided too. Some parts of the track are blocked unless you can shoot through obstacles before reaching them, or hit a jump pad. At some points you can change to travelling along the ceiling as well. Tokens can be collected en route, and used to obtain better weapons, but losing a life costs you the best one...

Evening Star

Evening Star

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1987

Evening Star is basically an enhanced Southern Belle - a steam engine simulator - with the route changed to early 1960s Somerset and Dorset line (from Bath to Bournemouth, England) and the locomotive being BR standard class 9F (2-10-0) "Evening Star" (number 92220, the last British steam engine built) hauling the "Pines Express". The game has a demonstration mode and seven scenarios of increased difficulty with the highest level allowing you full control of the train, with all the gauges to watch, more problems that arise and a random timetable to follow. You start at a standstill in...

Fantasia Diamond

Fantasia Diamond

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1984

Fantasia Diamond is a traditional text adventure with static graphics, where the titular diamond, a family heirloom has been stolen and has to be retrieved from a sinister riverside fortress. Along the way, Boris the Masterspy is to be rescued who was imprisoned during a previous attempt to recover the diamond. On the way you encounter elves, pixies, gnomes and an decidedly unfriendly woodcutter. In order to gain strength, you need to eat and drink and your strength determines how many objects you can carry. There is a real-time element to the game where every character takes an action every...

Gribbly's Day Out

Gribbly's Day Out

Commodore 64 - Released - June 1, 1985

Blabgorians possess the gift of psychic ability which allow them to levitate and move items with their minds, as a result they evolved without hands (who needs them?), a single foot (good for bouncing) and an oversized head (handy for containing large quantities of psychic energy). Gribbly Grobbly is your typical Blabgorian, and is tasked with the safety of the 'gribblets'. 'Gribblets' are infant Blabgorians; they have an armoured shell to protect them, but when flipped on their backs they expose their vulnerable belly and are unable to right themselves. They also have an annoying tendency to...

Nebulus

Nebulus

Enterprise - 1988

Nebulus is a video game created by John M. Phillips and published by Hewson Consultants in the late 1980s for various home computer systems including the Enterprise. It's a single player game with a 2 player alternating mode.

Netherworld

Netherworld

Commodore 64 - Released - 1988

The object is to fly a small spacecraft and collect as many diamonds as possible from the level. Once enough diamonds are collected, the craft must reach a teleporter to go to the next level before the time runs out. Aside of the time limit, there are various obstacles, ranging from monsters to items which can damage the craft or block the path. The ship can destroy some obstacles by shooting, sometimes turning them to diamonds as well. The game cover art features Tapanimäki's face.[citation needed] The cover art was done without his knowledge and approval. There was friction between the...

Paradroid

Paradroid

Commodore 64 - Released - March 1, 1985

The game is set on a spaceship viewed from a top-down perspective. The ship consists of numerous rooms and levels, each one populated by hostile robots or "droids". The player, in control of a special droid called the "Influence Device", must destroy all the other droids on the ship. Each droid (including the player) is represented as a circle around a three-digit number. The numbers roughly correspond to the droid's "power" or "level", in that higher-numbered droids are tougher to destroy. The Influence Device is numbered "001". The primary way in which the Influence Device destroys other...

Quazatron

Quazatron

Sinclair ZX Spectrum - Released - 1986

In Quazatron, the player-controlled droid (KLP-2 "Klepto", from the Classical Greek κλεπτω, steal) attempts to destroy all the other robots in the underground citadel of Quazatron and subsequent locations. Klepto is maneuvered across individual levels of Quazatron, which can be navigated between via a system of lifts. Levels may include floors at different heights, ramps, information points, recharge points and patrolling robots. It is Klepto's aim to destroy all the other robots, whereupon the lighting on that level is deactivated. This can be done by damaging them with a ranged weapon, by...

Southern Belle

Southern Belle

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1986

The ultimate aim is to travel from London to Brighton taking your place on the footplate of this King Arthur class 4-6-0 locomotive. A menu has seven options, including a demonstration run, various practise options and a problem run. A demonstration run automatically engages after a minute. This gives you an idea of the features and terrain that you are going to meet. When you have mastered the training, you can move on to more challenging schedules such as the record breaking run, set on July 26, 1903 at 48 minutes 41 seconds.

Steel

Steel

Commodore Amiga - Released - 1989

The space ship Steel is so advanced that it is completely operated by robots. As usually in video games, these robots went havoc and have to be put out of business. This job falls to the player who goes on the ship to shut down the security system. He is disguised as robot, but this does not stop the other ones from attacking. So the player wanders around the maze-like ship, consisting of non-scrolling screens, with the ultimate goal to collect eight cartridges. The player can hold up to three at the same time and needs to bring them to the main control panel. The enemy robots can be...

Uridium

Uridium

BBC Microcomputer System - Released - 1987

Uridium is a video game developed by Andrew Braybrook and ported to several home computers. It was converted for the BBC Microcomputer by AIM and published by Hewson.

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